Signé Barrière n°7 déc 13/jan-fév 2014
Signé Barrière n°7 déc 13/jan-fév 2014
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°7 de déc 13/jan-fév 2014

  • Périodicité : trimestriel

  • Editeur : O2C

  • Format : (210 x 270) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 100

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 8,9 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : Laurent Fau... le maestrographe.

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enggish english versin version Television(s) Trouble in TV-land Watch ‘n’go ? In just a single short decade, television as we watched it for half a century has gone through a technological and economic revolution. Everything has changed. Great news, or a great shame ? Its every whim. We don’t watch television anymore ; we download it, we phone it, we pick itup anywhere ; it is such as the technological revolution over the first decade of the 21st century made it  : everywhere. It flashesup on screens smaller than your hand. You can have it in your car, on the train, the underground, in your wallet, your handbag, a drawer, in a window on your computer screen, your mobile phone, even on the face of a watch. What is this world where « channels », « bundles » and « housewives under 50 » intertwine ? This world where units of time now start at « prime time » ? This world where the audience becomes judge and jury ? This Planet Television, whose circumference is so often – wrongly and rapidly – gauged in France, purely by the number of Euros (125) charged for the television licence (when it costs 184 Euros per household in the UK and 216 Euros in Germany). It is curious to observe how the extravagance of the new hertz technology stirredup so much discord when television first emerged more than half a century ago. And how another burst of extravagance - digital this time, what we call « web TV », or television over the internet, if you prefer – now raises, sixty years later, the same pseudo-technical arguments for the decades to come. For some, we are simply changing the tool, whereas for others it is the whole system of production that is at stake. The issue lies in knowing whether the way we watch television is a choice made by the viewer who, we are told, now prefers to watch alone in front of a personal screen, or whether this change in attitude is being discreetly instilled by the manufacturers of the networks associated with those who « fill the airwaves » page 48 – the channel owners. This cosy companionship is based on financial objectives, annual reports presented to shareholders – whether public or private sector. Television is a massindustry. As in mass-media, but also just massive. The quest for yield and return on investment opensup – as applicable – opportunities for original and strong drama, improves coverage of major sporting and music events and contributes to bold projects. « Television like it used to be » - pre-Internet - looks like a grain of sand on a dune when you realise that there are a billion websites currently active around the world. And this number is apparently increasing each month by 5%... To use a truism, in order to maintain a seat at this vast party, firstly you have to have a seat. And if you want to keep that seat, then « how it used to be » is no longer an option. You have to implement strategies, accept regulation and production specifications, without overlooking the grey areas that exist in any industrial revolution. And don’t forget, Mr, Mrs and Miss Viewer, that you can still turn the television off. And talk about it. Or not. American Import. Netflix. Crossing the streams The American online video and distribution giant, Netflix, is widening its web towards France, where the company will be in a position to offer its network services in the coming months. The market leader in remote rental of films, TV series and programmes, as wellas legal Internet streaming, whilst at the same time financing its own productions, Netflix is inseparable from the multimedia landscape in the US where it generates on average 30% of Internet traffic. Created in 1997 by the magnate Reed Hastings, the corporation now has more than 40 million subscribers in 52 countries. A modest subscription (less than 10 dollars per month) grants every customer access to films, TV series or programmes produced all over the world, 94 | Hiver 2014 - SignéBarrière
english version ii:TFLITf II1410KAz SLVIEi HOUSE of CPRDS II ALL E418aUE5 page 56 Only  : 7•i lil.1 only a few days after their official release. This is the great strength of the network  : an impressive catalogue of new films and « entertainment ». How do they do it ? Thanks to a tightly-woven web of contacts within the production companies – increasingly in the early stages of project financing – and a blueprint for negotiating the purchase of films without middle men. This « content » is then squeezed out online or sent to subscribers by a clever hidden system called « Red Envelope Business ». Subscriber order the films they want ; 24 hours later they are delivered to their door in a crimson envelope with no return address or date. Once viewed, the DVDs are simply slipped back into the red envelope and posted in any US Postal mailbox, guaranteed to be returned free of charge to Netflix. The American postal service is a paid partner in this commercial enterprise, which generates turnover in excess of 4 billion dollars. Beyond simple DVD rental/distribution, Netflix is now investing in original dramatic programming ; from « pipes » to film sets. A prize, the Netflix Award, gives financial encouragement to projects made by young producers, with the results now being premiered on Netflix’Internet platform. One of the most spectacular successes of this unique creative apparatus has become a global hit  : the excellent and disturbing series House of Cards with the bold and brilliant Kevin Spacey, who brought the idea to life. Broadcast in France on Canal+ but also available on the net, it has been a huge hit with viewers and Internet users. Netflix is another way to keep an eye on the box. Especially the television screen, but no longer exclusively… Linh-Dan Pham A discreet star Constantly travelling between London, Paris and Hong Kong, this Franco-Vietnamese actress knows what she wants and is not afraid to take creative risks. Revealed in Indochine, she was stunning in Mr Nobody. She has the chiaroscuro of a pearl− a pearlof energy. She does not only exist as the superbly silent music teacher in the piano lesson that was, in 2005, Jacques Audiard’s film, The Beat That My Heart Skipped. Nor can the evident and indisputable talent of Linh-Dan Pham as an actress be summedup in the role of Camille, the ‘daughter of’Catherine Deneuve, which Régis Wargnier entrusted her with in 1992 for his Oscar-winning film, Indochine. With Linh-Dan Pham, it’s allabout presence and absence. In fact, after the worldwide success of Indochine, she disappeared from the screens. For ten years  : « I was a young teenager. Acting interested me but page 72 SignéBarrière - Printemps - Hiver 2014 2013 | 95



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