Signé Barrière n°5 mar/avr/mai 2013
Signé Barrière n°5 mar/avr/mai 2013
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  • Parution : n°5 de mar/avr/mai 2013

  • Périodicité : trimestriel

  • Editeur : O2C

  • Format : (210 x 270) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 100

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enggish english versin version At La Petite Maison de Nicole Parisian cuisine at its best Every evening by the Champs Elysées, La Petite Maison de Nicole lays a Parisian table in the Hôtel Fouquet's Barrière. A few months, word of mouth and a choice of sun-filled dishes have made this restaurant much more than a simple address. A success. Every evening by the Champs Elysées, La Petite Maison de Nicole lays a Parisian table in the Hôtel Fouquet's Barrière. A few months, word of mouth and a choice of sun-filled dishes have made this restaurant much more than a simple address. A success. A first veil is offered by a simple décor. Then along come others, billowing. White, bright and beige. This is where South meets North. By the polished grey streets of the Champs-Elysées, tucked away alongside Fuquet's on avenue George V, it floats in the air like a light wind passing through a hushed atmosphere, covered with light canvases, speckled with muffled murmurs of laughter and conservation that the surprise arrival of food and the cheerful disposition of the young men and women humbly devoted to serving send circulating from table to table. Where are we ? "Right where you want to be. At my place ! " The tone is set. Nicole Rubi knows her house, determined, "Dominique" persuaded "Nicole" to bring a little azure to the glistening river Seine which glides along the bottom of avenue George V, just a few strokes from the Champs-Elysées. It was a tall order  : it is a delight. Nicole Rubi was persuaded to put the capital city on her menu, come and take a look, and demonstrate her talent and her character here as well. That discovery belongs to one, and that curiosity is a result of the other is irrelevant  : la Petite Maison is here. Really here. "Ooh la, la...", Joséphine Baker would have said that this eclectic atmosphere of fine food and shared contentment - the simplicity of al dente truffle pasta, the succulence of stuffed vegetables, the crunch of calamari... - contributes to what cannot be explained by the sole legend of Fouquet's  : as ever, this is about reality. Has the Mediterranean Petite Maison de Nicole earned a place for itself in Paris ? Yes. As surely as the cobblestones belong on the Champs-Elysées. Though Nicole remains faithful to her old stomping ground  : Nice. That's where it all began in a bundle of flavours more than twenty-five years ago. In an old tea room opposite the opera. Nicole Rubi came to put a little femininity back into the local cuisine whose strong simplicity is reminiscent of an art as subtle as Mediterranean sea mist, drawn as well from the terraces of the hinterland with recognisable inspiration from neighbouring Italy. Nicole might not wear her chef's whites, but she oversees everything  : from the order and freshness of her dishes, "straight out of the kitchen", to where each of her diners sits. Every last detail is taken care of. Mischievous and at times grouchy, she runs "her" petite maison. Every evening, her menu offers an unforgettable experience. Simply great. Voilà. Need I say more ? page 66 La Petite Maison, because she built it and because she lives there. That Hôtel Fouquet's Barrière in Paris now features these colours and these flavours of the Côte d'Azur is because two passions have crossed paths  : the passion for discovery, which is never without the passion for curiosity. Dominique Desseigne, president of the Barrière Groupe, wanted to share with Paris the delightful sensation he had already revealed at the Majestic Barrière de Cannes by gifting la Petite Maison with a little sister which, since 2010, has earned great renown. Unrelenting and. Laurent Lafitte « All roles written are gems » Although he admits to having once been lazy, Laurent Lafitte believes in « work well done » as he does in the beneficial effect of work. He honed his precise skills at the Comédie francaise as wellas in French comedies brought to the cinema by real popular success. We go to meet this modest man. In « (Nearly) 16 », a UGC film directed by Tristan Seguela, Laurent Lafitte from the Comédie française plays a brilliant young lawyer who suddenly starts suffering from delayed puberty. Out at the beginning of July, this surprising story which goes much deeper than the character’s hormonal changes is a far cry from the real life of this man who is mad about theatre and who is finally finding his place – and his plays – in amongst the 96 | Printemps 2013 - SignéBarrière
english version talent of French show business. Signé Barrière  : When asked to state their professions on administrative forms, Cocteau wrote « poet », the actor Jean Gabin, who lived in the country, wrote « farmer » and Alain Delon put « actor ». What would you put ? Laurent Lafitte - Ah ! Um… Actor, I suppose. What an unexpected question. page 76 Why ? Because I’ve never asked myself that before. It has been said that what guided your acting career to the stage is a « thing » you feel for tragedy. Is that true ? Yes. I love tragedy. (He says this again in a loud and serious voice, smiling)  : YES, I LOVE TRAGEDY. (And continues in a slightly playful tone)  : I realise that that answer must make me look mad. No. Good. In that case, let’s keep things simple. You call me « Master » and let’s talk about life. Don’t we always say that it’s allabout putting life into theatre and theatre into life ? Your life, then, for the past year has been as a young actor at the illustrious Comédie française. In 2013 would you say that knowledge of the text is stillalive in the theatrical world ? Yes, and twelve times yes, since that’s the number of syllables in an Alexandrine. Even though I hear some people – not people at the Comédie française – moan about the repertoire being « heavy ». But this repertoire bears witness to different times and eras  : speech was expressed in the speed of life at that time. But the era of the internet, flights across continents, the TGV and cars has made everything go faster. Be that as it may  : all roles that have been written are gems. They are the easiest to play. And thank you for suggesting that I’m still young, but I will soon be 40… Well, that’s not a tragedy. No, of course not. I’m just in Act I, scene 2. The cinema has just given you roles that the public loved in two films that are well put together  : « Little White Lies » and « On the Other Side of the Tracks ». But you still talk about the theatre… The theatre is a firmfixture in my life. And cinema isn’t ? I used to be lazy. In the theatre, you have real rehearsal time. You can simmer. To stay in the colour and the pleasure of this taste and this appetite, I hope I am never… satisfied. « Satisfied » is an ugly word, but that’s the right word. On the other hand, cinema is very hard for the actors because it sets a specific moment or moments in stone forever. The cinema fixes something, whereas in the theatre it remains in the air. It’s not exactly a hardship but there is a difference between just playing the game and getting it right. But being an actor isn’t just about speaking words written by others. That’s why the work reassures me. Everything fell into place for me when I decided to go to England – I was completely determined – and I went to the Guildford School of Acting to study singing and musical theatre. I was completely swamped with classes  : from 9 to 10, dance and modern jazz ; three lots of 3-hour drama classes each day… The Cours Florent drama school, the Guildford School of Acting, the French National Academy of Dramatic Arts  : so many competitive exams and putting yourself in positions where you are judged. Why ? I believethat doing an apprenticeship is the right thing to do. I believein the truth of the facts. I realised that I loved to learn. Even if it means doing something as much as finding the best courses. Theatre, cinema and also television  : a lot of people saw your lively and original gift for entertaining when the César film awards were televised. Which brings us to comedy. Because you are incredibly like Zebedee… Really ? Zebedee ! I really like the idea of the « spring » in that word. Because laughing and making people laugh is a real power. On stage as on the screen. But in the cinema, the real power belongs to the scriptwriter, the dialogue writer and the director who carves out the story. It’s in the final cut, choosing the best of what the whole film reel shows. So I come back to the writing again, which is absolutely critical. It’s that soul that is just as beautiful in films as it is in the theatre. And when there’s no dialogue in a script, who do you think of ? James Stewart. He was a wonderful actor who was broughtup in the theatre and he had the finest range. SignéBarrière - Printemps 2013 | 97



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