Signé Barrière n°5 mar/avr/mai 2013
Signé Barrière n°5 mar/avr/mai 2013
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  • Parution : n°5 de mar/avr/mai 2013

  • Périodicité : trimestriel

  • Editeur : O2C

  • Format : (210 x 270) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 100

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english version - the past seems like an inaccessible dream. The new generations are (re)discovering the charmof being born in a past world, in turmoil. The privilege of old age  : being four score years is a guarantee that you have lived, have believed in many things, have lost them on the way, and have found the resources of an unflagging resilience. Being twenty is to wonder what will become of you, how to invent your future, or draw on your roots, or sit on the bus. The seats are occupied. page 48 Age, the new canon of beauty, health and serenity ? In a society that is faltering, the years help you stand on your own two feet. With the assurance of an enviable pension, the progress of medicine, the miracles of cosmetic surgery, old people can even imagine living to 100 as though they were 20. Why deprive yourself ? The old no longer die, they don’t see the point. The heroes of the day are octogenarians, nonagenarians, soon they’ll be centenarians. Their strength is having a story to tell  : their own. Nothing has changed really  : grandparents are still those open books whose stories stir the imaginations of the young. That tireless torchbearer of indignation, the late Stéphane Hessel, hogs the best-seller lists in the bookshops with books as skinny as a top model  : the ultimate vanity. Jean d’Ormesson sets the spirit flying with his culture and his easygoing attitude ; philosopher Michel Serres exudes intelligence ; and in the theatre, René de Obaldia is the epitome of fantasy. With his reassuring frankness, Lyonnais restaurateur Paul Bocuse remains the pope of gastronomy, Pierre Cardin wants to build a skyscraper in Venice, KarlLagerfeld stamps his mark on everything that moves. Johnny Halliday fills stadiums - true, he is only 70. We could also mention the Rolling Stones, especially Mick Jagger ; and David Bowie whose exhibition is wowing the in-crowd in London ; Leonard Cohen, who is taking his blues round all the auditoria of the planet ; or Bob Dylan, Clint Eastwood and that exquisite dandy, Jean Rochefort. At Cannes as in Hollywood, Michael Haneke is walking off with prizes for Amour, a film that portrays the magnificent and tragic relationship of a couple in the twilight of their lives. Swinging oldies, even when their fate is nearing the end. Men have become rare whiskies, great wines. Like them, they are cultivated, they improve with age and maturity. In their wake, like putting in tanned leather armchairs, brands are reviving their standards, products are taking on new life. The new is being made with the old, and sometimes even, the chicest of chic, the old with the new. The patina gives it soul. Vinyl records are once more turning at 33rpm, the fabric of jeans fresh from the factory is more torn than a broken heart ; cooks are taking their inspiration from traditional dishes, forgotten vegetables are resurfacing. It’s the retro-contemporary wave. In these days of the internet, electronics and browsing on Facebook, hybrid magazine/books are finding unexpected success. With their look of disgraceful old ladies, these mooks with their yellowed paper are debunking the forecasts of those who announced the death of the old industry. One of these titles, Schnock, with the faces of Jean Yanne, Daniel Prévost or Jean-Pierre Marielle on the cover, calls itself, not without arrogance, « the magazine for old people aged 27 to 87 ». This return to grace of age, the consequence of an ageing population and of running out of ideas, is also, by a curious paradox, the reflection of an aspiration for greater freedom. In an ever more uniformworld, controlled by technology, the diktats of fashion or ready-made ideas, old people look almost like rebels. For those of them who have managed to glorify their existence, give it impetus and meaning, their freedom of tone, appearance and thinking is a tremendous life lesson. Today, old age, worn with style, is a formof grandeur. (*) Bertrand de Saint Vincent is a columnist on Le Figaro and author of "Tout Paris" (Grasset). Roundly reminiscent Something new in the rear-view Car trends are also taking centre stage. Gone are the square bodies and sharp angles of the aggressive 1980s. Back in are the reassuring curves of old. « Make it round ». In the invention-filled Roaring Twenties after the First World War, André Citroën, a very creative and ambitious French engineer, had one simple principle in mind  : a teardrop. The CX, the drag coefficient. The 1930s laid down the principles for inventing and manufacturing the modern car, at a 94 | Printemps 2013 - SignéBarrière
english version time when the focus wasn’t so much on saving energy as it was on finding speed from the comfort of a cocoon. Designers both industrial and from elsewhere were page 58 quickly hired by the big American corporations to design the now iconic aerodynamic curves. These sketches which became models are still the standard. Like the one that the European car manufacturers imported from the United States in 1934  : the revolutionary design of the Chrysler Airflow cast aside the square and straight lines for a tapered shape that Peugeot was the first to use in its ranges of horizontal comma-shaped car bodywork. Today cars of all ranges are « dressed » in a way that sets aside the sharp angles of the 1980s, with a return to the reassuring curves of the VW Beetle, Austin and Fiat 500. Rightup to the Renault Zoe, the all-electric car that’s as plump as a light bulb, or the Mercedes E Class (with a drag coefficient of 0.24) that sits on the road like an oval pearl. Rightup to the Citroën chevron itself which – despite being nearly 100 years old – has lost its sharp angles to become once again the chubby curve that was found on the wings of the legendary Traction 15. Everything is round. Even the wing mirrors, the dials on the dashboard, the covered headlights, and the indicators wrappedup in the bumpers. André Citroën was right  : the car was made to be round. Before the hugely famous 2CV, the first of his cars to find commercial success was the Citron, which was as yellow as a… tennis ball. Perfumes Not such demure bottles From the fragrant warmth of a madeleine, Marcel Proust extracted the atmosphere of an elegy for lost time. With the same patience, perfumers bring back different times of our lives. With their pluses and minuses... There is the exhilaration. And the bottle. The history of perfume and eaux de toilette is the history of an alchemy that dates back to early antiquity and often carries subliminal messages. When the essence of beings captures and expresses all their meanings, it matters little « how it is done », what counts is « what it does ». And so we asked a young woman (aged 38) and a not-so-young man (aged 53) to reflect for Signé Barrière on the fragrances of their memories and their present impressions of perfumes found again or newly discovered. For her  : « J'adore - is the word... - the aesthetic of the great standards of perfumery for women. And, of course, Dior. But I do feel that the blends of those very great perfume houses sometimes lack modernity. The flowery tones of Issey Miyake and Kenzo are for me fragrances of mood, from day to day. What I like is the loyalty and the rare, bold spirit of perfumes. Chloé and its light ribbon on a gently austere bottle are there in my imagination, once and for all. I couldn’t replace them - and yet... - except for the gentle chic of Elie Saab, so "1930s elegance ». For him  : « One perfume stays with me  : that of my father, an officer. Guerlain’s Habit Rouge. A presence that I know my mother sometimes wore on evenings when he was away, a discreet drop on each of her fine temples. As for me, I wear Héritage. By the same perfume house... But I acknowledge the major influences of Yves Saint Laurent and Dior. Having said that, I appreciate the modernity of the classics when they make innovations page 62 to cross the ages. They are unequalled. And therefore original. » For them  : « No Vetiver ! On the other hand a touch of nostalgia and a special favourite of two ads  : the first with the shutters of the façade of a luxury hotel that slam shut on the fragrance of Bois des Îles of Égoïste, a fragrance for men by Chanel in 1990. The second, in 2013, for Guerlain’s Petite Robe Noire that drove Paris wild from the right bank to the left. » SignéBarrière - Printemps 2013 | 95



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