En Route n°2015-03 mars
En Route n°2015-03 mars
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°2015-03 de mars

  • Périodicité : mensuel

  • Editeur : Spafax Canada inc.

  • Format : (221 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 124

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 36,1 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : dossier... une odyssée du vin grec.

  • Prix de vente (PDF) : gratuit

Dans ce numéro...
< Pages précédentes
Pages : 54 - 55  |  Aller à la page   OK
Pages suivantes >
54 55
ritual I’m almost sorry to have narrowly missed). Okinawan time is different too; being five minutes late doesn’t precipitate panic, and people here enjoy pointing out how laid-back they are. I’m heading to Ogimi Village, world HQ for cool old ladies. It is not actually a village but a cluster of hamlets with a population of around 3,000. The farther up we go on the main island, the rougher, less populated and quieter it gets… until I slide open the door to the community hall. Suddenly, eight of these octogenarians-plus are all over me with hugs and smiles and little gifts of sweets. They ostensibly gather here to get some exercise, but it’s soon obvious they really get together to giggle. After some South Pacific-style dancing – watery motions, soft on the feet with undulating arms – a zippy 89-year-old in a yellow shirt and a kerchief waltzes me around. (I have never felt so tall in my life.) Then someone finds a baseball cap and busts out the hip-hop moves. And then, in what can only be called a throwdown, they form a circle and goad, point, laugh expectantly and motion for more hips from me; only twerking will satisfy them, apparently. Their lack of concern for shame, mine or theirs, is liberating. And they’re all mind-blowingly jaunty and spry, obviously. Along with physical activity and a sense of belonging, the Okinawan diet is credited with keeping people around here acting and looking incredibly immature or at least 20 years younger than their real age. Plant-based ingredients are key, including an amazing variety of local seaweed – mozuku tempura is a must-try – greens, bitter melon and the pale but carotene-rich Okinawan carrot, along with sun-warm mango, papaya, dragon fruit and passion fruit. Down the road from the dance hall, Emi No Mise is a casual restaurant – the sign is propped up on a chair outside next to an herb and vegetable garden – operated by Emiko Kinjo, a former school lunch lady who trained as a chef and nutritionist in Tokyo before moving here to showcase the benefits of the Okinawan diet. In a head scarf and apron with chopsticks in hand, she’s preparing doughnuts when I show up in her cottagey kitchen. (Even healthy cultures like their fried dough.) Kinjo is one of those people who makes everything look effortless. She pretty much throws a handful of tiny fish over her shoulder, and they land, perfectly arranged, on a polka-dot plate. All she has to do is garnish with halved shikuwasa, a perfumed local citrus fruit said to have anti-cancer properties, and it’s picture perfect, even by high Japanese standards. I sit down for an elaborate bento box that includes sweet-potato greens picked that morning by a 96-year-old, the same 96-year-old who told me she has never had a cold in her life. The motto around here is live long, work long. “Eighty is too young to go,” my interpreter says between bites, not using his inside voice. In the nearby hamlet of Yako, homes with red-tiled roofs (from the iron in the soil) are sunk behind low-slung walls, entrances guarded by statues of shisas, lion dogs derived from the idea of a dragon mistranslated from early Chinese texts. A man in a hat with a Mallard-duck band is waiting for me. “My profession is birds; butterflies are my hobby,” Noritaka Ichida says by way of introduction. When he moved here from Tokyo well after retirement, he says, locals asked who the young guy was. The default setting of his face is beaming, as though he has a secret, which he does. He ushers me to a compact valley, the jungle on one side a full-tilt boogie of insect ecstasy, the above Bubbling pots of shabu-shabu made with local pork are on the table at Chanyaa, a traditional home turned restaurant and guesthouse in Bise. opposite page One of many unnamed islands that define the view off the coast of Yagaji-jima. ci-dessus À Bise, des plats de shabu-shabu fumants, faits de porc patrimonial, sont servis aux tables du Chanyaa, une maison traditionnelle convertie en restaurant et petit hôtel. Page de droite L’une des nombreuses îles sans nom qui forme le paysage côtier de Yagaji-jima. formée comme chef et nutritionniste à Tokyo avant de venir ici promouvoir le régime Okinawa. Baguettes à la main, coiffée d’un foulard et portant un tablier, elle est à préparer des beignes quand j’arrive dans sa cuisine campagnarde. (Même les cultures saines apprécient la pâte frite.) M me Kinjo est de celles à qui tout paraît facile. Elle lance quasiment une poignée de petits poissons pardessus son épaule et ils atterrissent dans une assiette à pois, parfaitement disposés. Elle n’a plus qu’à ajouter une demi-mandarine Shekwasha, un agrume odorant de la région qui aurait des propriétés anticancéreuses, et le dressage est parfait, même selon les stricts critères japonais. Je m’assois devant un bento élaboré qui comprend des feuilles de patate douce cueillies ce matin par une dame de 96 ans, celle-là même qui m’a dit n’avoir jamais eu un rhume de sa vie. Vis longtemps, travaille longtemps, voilà la devise locale. « Partir à 80 ans, c’est trop tôt », marmonne l’interprète entre deux bouchées, oubliant d’utiliser sa voix intérieure. Dans le hameau voisin de Yako, les maisons couvertes de tuiles rouges (tirées du sol ferreux) sont retranchées derrière des murets, leur entrée gardée par des shisas, ces statues mi-lion, mi-chien nées d’une mauvaise traduction de la notion de dragon dans d’anciens écrits chinois. Un homme coiffé d’un chapeau au ruban à motif de colvert m’attend. « Mon métier, c’est les oiseaux ; les papillons sont mon passe-temps », se présente Noritaka Ichida. Quand il est arrivé de Tokyo, retraité de longue date, on se demandait par ici qui était ce jeune homme. Son visage au naturel est éclatant, comme s’il avait un secret, ce qui est le cas. Il me conduit à une petite vallée avec, d’un côté, la jungle où dansent allègrement une débauche d’insectes, et de l’autre des fermes en terrasse envahies par un saisissant camaïeu d’ombrages verts. Au centre se trouve un bosquet de petits mandariniers Shekwasha noueux, plantés il y a 50 ans. Même sans me dresser sur la pointe des pieds, pas besoin 03.2015 enRoute.aircanada.com
It’s easy to go from remote to remoter here, with barely inhabited islands for surfing and snorkelling dotting the shore. I believe my interpreter when he talks about Japanese Vikings called wokou, who roamed these waters hundreds of years ago. Il est facile de trouver toujours plus reculé ici, avec tant d’îles quasi désertes, parfaites pour le surf et la plongée libre près des côtes. Je crois mon interprète lorsqu’il évoque les Wakos, Des pirates japonAIS qui écumaient ces eaux il y a des siècles. 55



Autres parutions de ce magazine  voir tous les numéros


Liens vers cette page
Couverture seule :


Couverture avec texte parution au-dessus :


Couverture avec texte parution en dessous :


En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 1En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 2-3En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 4-5En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 6-7En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 8-9En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 10-11En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 12-13En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 14-15En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 16-17En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 18-19En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 20-21En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 22-23En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 24-25En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 26-27En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 28-29En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 30-31En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 32-33En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 34-35En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 36-37En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 38-39En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 40-41En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 42-43En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 44-45En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 46-47En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 48-49En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 50-51En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 52-53En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 54-55En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 56-57En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 58-59En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 60-61En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 62-63En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 64-65En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 66-67En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 68-69En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 70-71En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 72-73En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 74-75En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 76-77En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 78-79En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 80-81En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 82-83En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 84-85En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 86-87En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 88-89En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 90-91En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 92-93En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 94-95En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 96-97En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 98-99En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 100-101En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 102-103En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 104-105En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 106-107En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 108-109En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 110-111En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 112-113En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 114-115En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 116-117En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 118-119En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 120-121En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 122-123En Route numéro 2015-03 mars Page 124