CNES Mag n°36 jan/fév/mar 2008
CNES Mag n°36 jan/fév/mar 2008
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°36 de jan/fév/mar 2008

  • Périodicité : trimestriel

  • Editeur : Centre National d'Études Spatiales

  • Format : (210 x 280) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 72

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 7,6 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : le CNES et les vols habités.

  • Prix de vente (PDF) : gratuit

Dans ce numéro...
< Pages précédentes
Pages : 26 - 27  |  Aller à la page   OK
Pages suivantes >
26 27
ERATJ dossier special report 26 France supporting the La contribution de la France ESA/D. DUCROS, 2007 Station spatiale inter cnesmag u JANVIER 2008
ISS enters a new era u Dossier rédigé par/Special Report by PIERRE-FRANÇOIS MOURIAUX International Space Station à la nationale L’environnement exceptionnel de la Station spatiale internationale, grand mécano de l’espace, offre l’opportunité de vivre et de travailler en impesanteur dans le seul laboratoire orbital qui existe au monde. Ces conditions sont importantes parce que la gravité influence presque tous les mécanismes biologiques, physiques et chimiques sur Terre. Cette absence des effets de la gravité nous permet de comprendre le pourquoi des choses. A huge Mecca no set in space, the International Space Station offers a unique environment for living and working in weightlessnessin the world’s only orbital laboratory. Microgravity conditions are important because gravity influences virtually all biological, physical and chemical mechanisms here on Earth. Freeing ourselves from its effects helps us to understand such mechanisms better. ISS enters a new era Conceived in the 1960s and started in the 1980s, the United States’large orbital laboratory became an international project in 1988. At the same time, the Soviet Union—and later Russia—was planning a space station to succeed Mir. The US and Russia therefore decided to join forces to build the International Space Station (ISS), on-orbit assembly getting underway in 1998. Today, with the arrival of the European Columbus laboratory module, the ISS is set to enter a new era of intensive use for scientific research in which Europe and France will play a key role. The station partners intend to use it as a testing ground for future missions to the Moon and other planets. s NASA engineers first envisaged a station in the early 1960s, when energies were focused on landing on the Moon. The station they conceived would serve as a laboratory, a vantage point for observing Earth and the stars, and as a staging post. But after budget cuts in 1969, the United States’first Skylab station was designed with unused equipment from the Apollo programme. Skylab received three crews between May 1973 and February 1974 before it was abandoned and burnedup on re-entry in 1979. So, when the U.S. space shuttle entered service in 1981, there was no orbital station for it to dock to, limiting missions to two weeks at most. International partnership In the mid-1980s, the United States invited partners to join their project to build a permanent orbital space station comprising several pressurized modules and other systems. The partners would share the cost, manufacture and launch of the station elements, station utilization and maintenance operations. Europe 1, Canada and Japan answered the call in 1988, soon joined by Brazil. But spiralling costs led to a rescoping of the project in 1993. For political reasons, Russia and the United States—having previously operated the Mir space station together— joined forces with international partners to build the ISS. While pursuing its partnership with Russia, Europe committed to provide 8.3% of the station’s western segment, under NASA’s leadership. Its main contributions would be the Columbus laboratory module and c 27 JANVIER 2008 u cnesmag



Autres parutions de ce magazine  voir tous les numéros


Liens vers cette page
Couverture seule :


Couverture avec texte parution au-dessus :


Couverture avec texte parution en dessous :


CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 1CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 2-3CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 4-5CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 6-7CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 8-9CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 10-11CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 12-13CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 14-15CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 16-17CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 18-19CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 20-21CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 22-23CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 24-25CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 26-27CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 28-29CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 30-31CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 32-33CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 34-35CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 36-37CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 38-39CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 40-41CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 42-43CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 44-45CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 46-47CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 48-49CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 50-51CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 52-53CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 54-55CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 56-57CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 58-59CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 60-61CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 62-63CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 64-65CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 66-67CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 68-69CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 70-71CNES Mag numéro 36 jan/fév/mar 2008 Page 72