BIZweek n°265 8 nov 2019
BIZweek n°265 8 nov 2019
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°265 de 8 nov 2019

  • Périodicité : hebdomadaire

  • Editeur : Capital Publications Ltd

  • Format : (260 x 370) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 6

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 3,5 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : raccordement à l'éléctricité, nette amélioration de Maurice.

  • Prix de vente (PDF) : gratuit

Dans ce numéro...
< Pages précédentes
Pages : 4 - 5  |  Aller à la page   OK
Pages suivantes >
4 5
VENDREDI 08 NOVEMBRE 2019 BIZWEEK ÉDITION 265 « In line with global practices, the threshold to account for outages is three minutes. However, Maurice perdait 17 places au classement the CEB unintentionally général de Ease reported of Doing to the Business World Bank de la that Banque in Mauritius mondiale. outages Ainsi, less pour than le 30 minutes are not accounted for. This led to the information being classified as non-applicable, classement 2017, le pays, pourtant resulting premier to a score en Afrique, of zero in est the passé Quality de la Index, 32e where (2016) Mauritius à la 49e could place. have Un scored des indicateurs six out of qui n’a pas joué eneight, » notre faveur faisait ressortir  : le raccordement le ministre des à l’électricité. Finances au Depuis, Parlement le en pays réponse s’est rattrapé à notre position dans Maurice n’avait pas enregistré un bon score sous Dans le rapport de 2018, la situation était Ease le of rapport Doing Business Ease 2017. of Doing Business 2017. l’indicateur « Getting electricity », en 2016, en raison la suivante Dans le  : rapport de 2018, la situation était comme dessous  : GETTING ELECTRICITY (RANK) 51 d’un « misreporting » de la part Maurice du Central n’avait Electricity pas enregistré Board. un bon Pour score cet sous l’indicateur Distance « Getting To electricity Frontier », en score 2016, for getting electricity (0-100) 82.03 indicateur, en raison Maurice d’un « misreporting était passée » de de la la 41ème part du Central Procedures Electricity Board. (number) Pour cet indicateur, 4 place Maurice à la 110ème était passée place. Time (days) 81 de la 41ème place à la 110ème place. Les données étaient comme suit dans le Cost (% of income per capita) 229.4 rapport Les données 2017 (paru étaient en comme 2016)  : suit dans le rapport 2017 Reliability (paru en 2016)  : of supply and transparency of tariffs index (0-8) 6 In line with global practices, the threshold to Depuis, Maurice a connu une nette « In line with global practices, the threshold to account for outages is three minutes. However, account for outages is three minutes. However, the amélioration en ce qui concerne le raccordement Bank that à l’électricité. in Mauritius outages less than 30 CEB the CEB unintentionally unintentionally reported reported to the World to the Bank World that minutes Mauritius are not outages accounted less than for. 30 This minutes led to are the information On fait being même classified mieux que as non-applicable, la région d’Afrique subsaharienne Mauritius could et have les scored pays six à revenus out of not resulting accounted to for. a score This led of zero to the in information the Quality being Index, where classified as non-applicable, resulting to a score of élevés de l’Organisation de coopération et zeroeight, » in the faisait Quality ressortir Index, le where ministre Mauritius des Finances could au de Parlement développement en réponse économiques à notre position (OCDE) dans have le rapport scored six Ease out of of Doingeight, » Business faisait 2017. ressortir en termes de nombre de procédures, de le ministre des Finances au Parlement en jours et de fiabilité. [Voir illustration] réponse Dans le à rapport notre de position 2018, la dans situation le rapport était comme dessous  : LA TOUR RACCORDEMENT À L’ÉLECTRICITÉ Nette amélioration de Maurice dans le Ease of Doing Business La nouvelle a choqué et inquiété les autorités et les acteurs de la place financière. En 2016, pour la première fois, GETTING ELECTRICITY (RANK) 110 Depuis, Maurice a connu une nette amélioration en ce qui concerne le raccordement à Distance To Frontier score for getting electricity (0-100) 63.22 l’électricité. Procedures (number) 4 Time (days) On fait même mieux 81 que la région d’Afrique subsaharienne et les pays à revenus élevés de Cost (% of income per capita) l’Organisation de 247.7 coopération et de développement économiques (OCDE) en termes de Reliability of supply and transparency of tariffs index nombre (0-8) de 0 procédures, de jours et de fiabilité. [Voir illustration] GETTING ELECTRICITY (RANK) 51 Distance To Frontier score for getting electricity (0-100) 82.03 Procedures (number) 4 Time (days) 81 Cost (% of income per capita) 229.4 Reliability of supply and transparency of tariffs index (0-8) 6 Depuis, Maurice a connu une nette amélioration en ce qui concerne le raccordement à l’électricité. On fait même mieux que la région d’Afrique subsaharienne et les pays à revenus élevés de l’Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques (OCDE) en termes de nombre de procédures, de jours et de fiabilité. [Voir illustration] Maurice n’avait pas enregistré un bon score sous l’indicateur « Getting electricity », en 2016, en raison d’un « misreporting » de la part du Central Electricity Board. Pour cet indicateur, Maurice était passée de la 41ème place à la 110ème place. Les données étaient comme suit dans le rapport 2017 (paru en 2016)  : GETTING ELECTRICITY (RANK) 110 Distance To Frontier score for getting electricity (0-100) 63.22 Procedures (number) 4 Time (days) 81 Cost (% of income per capita) 247.7 Reliability of supply and transparency of tariffs index (0-8) 0 4
VENDREDI 08 NOVEMBRE 2019 BIZWEEK ÉDITION 265 As part of an ongoing support, COMESA has convened a Regional Resilience Framework Validation Meeting on 5 - 6 November, in Nairobi, Kenya to provide a platformfor Member States to review and provide final input into the draft Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework. The development of the framework has been informedby the increasing vulnerability of regional countries, to climate change and other disasters such as flooding, landslides, droughts, cyclones, disease epidemics, heat waves among others. Seventeen out of the 21 COMESA Member States are participating in the meeting. These are  : Burundi, Comoros, Djibouti, D.R. Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Eswatini, Kenya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Rwanda, Seychelles, Sudan, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Mid this year, the region experienced devastating cyclones Idai and Kenneth that affected Malawi and Zimbabwe and Mozambique, causing more than 1,000 deaths, infrastructure and property damage running into billions of dollars. COMESA Climate Change advisor, Dr Mclay Kanyangarara, explained during the opening of the meeting that the Regional Resilience Framework willalso address the fragmented and haphazard approach to managing risks, shocks and stresses, which has proved to be ineffective as the magnitude of loss and damage continues to escalate. « Resources allocated to much needed developmental projects and programmes are diverted to deal with the effects of the disasters thereby trapping many in a vicious cycle of poverty and underdevelopment, » he observed. He said the validation meeting was critical in providing a platformfor Member States to review and provide final input into the draft resilience framework after which it will be presented to the COMESA Policy Organs ACTA PUBLICA COMESA Regional Climate Change Resilience Framework Developed COMESA has developed a draft Regional Resilience Framework to build the capacity of its members to withstand disasters occasioned by adverse effects of climate change AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL for adoption and subsequently, implementation. Resilience will build the capacity of the Member States to reduce the risk of climate change disasters on the national economies. During the two days, the delegates discussed the implementation arrangements and financing opportunities for the regional resilience framework interventions, comeup with recommendations of domesticating the resilience framework provisions in order to strengthen national resilience building efforts and develop an implementation roadmap of the COMESA regional resilience framework. Trump’s withdrawal from Paris climate agreement is ‘monstrous’Responding to news that Donald Trump has initiated the formal withdrawal of the United States from the Paris Agreement on climate change - a move which would make the US the only country in the world not part of the pact - Kumi Naidoo, Amnesty International’s Secretary General, said  : « Selfish, reckless and monstrous - the continued attempts to pull the US out of the Paris Agreement is potentially the single most destructive act of the Trump presidency. « President Trump may believehis commitment to fossil fuels will win him votes, but it willalso cost lives. By putting his own personal agenda before the needs of the world’s population, he is wilfully vandalising global attempts to save humanity. « The climate emergency is one of the greatest threats to human rights of our age - its effects wreaking famine, poverty and homelessness on great swathes of the globe. « And as the world’s second-biggest carbon-emitter, the US has a pivotal role to play in preventing the human rights catastrophe that will be inevitable unless greenhouse gas emissions are drastically reduced. « By pursuing an exit of the Paris Agreement, President Trump is sending a clear message to the hundreds of millions of people whose existence is threatened by the climate crisis  : he doesn’t care whether they live or die. » Year-long withdrawal process President Trump is beginning a year-long process to formally withdraw from the Paris climate agreement. He will not be able to finalise the withdrawal until a day after the US presidential election in November 2020. The agreement, which entered into force in November 2016, is the world’s most ambitious climate change commitment, ratified by 125 countries. Under it, the US had committed to reduce emissions to 26-28% below 2005 levels by 2025. Without strong action to prevent it, severe climate change is expected to cause 250,000 deaths per year between 2030 and 2050 - due to malaria, malnutrition, diarrhoea and heat stress. More than one billion people will see a severe reduction in water resources if there is a 2°C rise in the mean global temperature. There would also be an increase in the number of people at risk of hunger of at least 600 million by 2080, with at least 330 million displaced through flooding. Overall, hundreds of millions of people would be denied their rights to life, health, food, water and housing. The adverse effects are likely to be disproportionately experienced by those living in poverty, particularly women and girls, indigenous peoples and others disadvantaged due to discrimination. 5

1 2-3 4-5 6


Autres parutions de ce magazine  voir tous les numéros


Liens vers cette page
Couverture seule :


Couverture avec texte parution au-dessus :


Couverture avec texte parution en dessous :