Architecture Canada n°8 1er semestre 2010
Architecture Canada n°8 1er semestre 2010
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°8 de 1er semestre 2010

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 44

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 3 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : des établissements de justice novateurs.

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www.raic.org/2009 Artistic Flair Saint-Jérôme courthouse illustrates artful way for design By Christopher Guly The renovated Palais de justice in Saint-Jérôme, Quebec is a work of art. It also is a place to showcase the artwork of others. While the statutory nature of Quebec’s Civil Code might lend itself to a uniformity of design for courthouses, a Quebec City architectural firmhas shown that these places can also have an artistic fl air. In designing an expansion of the Palais de justice in Saint-Jérôme, a group of Quebec architects - Bélanger Beauchemin Morency, architectes et urbanistes ; Birtz Bastien Beaudoin Laforest architectes ; Yelle et Maillé architecte and Richard Côté architecte- turned the traditional courtroom design on its head. « Usually, courtrooms have no windows in public spaces, » explains Rémi Morency, a principal with Bélanger Beauchemin Morency. « But since we didn’t have to accommodate judges’offi ces as part of the expansion, we were able to inverse the traditional plan – a first, as far as I know, for this type of building in Quebec. » 20 ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA The expansion involved creating new space for courtrooms between an existing courthouse and an offi ce tower, both owned by the Société Immobilière du Québec, the province’s public works agency. A « round-table » confi guration is a distinct feature within the courtrooms. Lawyers sit around a semi-circle, while the judge is seated in the middle, albeit at a slightly higher elevation. « This invites less formal, more pleasant discussion,
Architects : Bélanger Beauchemin Morency, architectes et urbanistes ; Birtz Bastien Beaudoin Laforest architectes ; Yelle et Maillé architecte ; Richard Côté architecte./Photos : François Bastien while still respecting the judge’s authority, » says Morency, who adds that the request for this type of seating arrangement came directly from the bench. In fact, the judges were also involved in some of the interior details, choosing neutral paint colours for their offi ces that are located in an existing offi ce building near the new expansion. By contrast, the tones in the public spaces of the new building had some variety. Ceilings and walls where there is plenty of natural light are white ; other walls are bathed in colour to provide a visual pop as wellas to serve as points of reference for visitors to navigate through the building. A sense of opennessis captured in other ways. Running between the old and new courthouses is a two-storey atrium filled with natural light and which provides views of the courtrooms on one side and the administrative offi ces on the other. Public spaces, such as waiting areas, are situated on the interior perimeter to attract light – though windows use obscure glazing to prevent direct views from the outside. But the expanded St-Jérôme courthouse, completed a decade ago, also shines in some of its subtleties. A « round-table » configuration is a distinct feature within the courtrooms. Artistic Flair « In the overall design, we wanted to de-dramatize the space without removing the importance of respect toward the justice system. » For instance, courtroom ceilings slope toward the judge and lawyers to symbolize the focus of deliberations. And inasmuch as the renovated space is a work of art, it also is a place to showcase the artwork of others. At each end of the atrium hallare large cube-like spaces that incorporate sculptures by Quebec artist Pierre Bourgault. Inspired by the Inuit children’s game, Ayarak, which teaches life values, Bourgault produced two sculptures – one made of aluminium, the other of wood – to create his own symbols of justice. « In the overall design, we wanted to dedramatize the space without removing the importance of respect toward the justice system, » explains Morency. « We created a building that is pleasant, rather than one that is austere or strict. » ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 21 www.raic.org/2009



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