Architecture Canada n°6 1er semestre 2009
Architecture Canada n°6 1er semestre 2009
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  • Parution : n°6 de 1er semestre 2009

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 52

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  • Dans ce numéro : l'Institut royal d'architecture du Canada.

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www.raic.org/2009 PHOTO : CRAIG SPENCE Art in Architecture Art in Architecture cross-curricular teaching tool : Building a solid foundation for the future Recently I received a copy of a cross-curricular teaching tool developed by the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) – Art in Architecture. I was glad to have the opportunity to view the teaching kit and specifi - cally the DVD In Search of a Soul : Building the Canadian War Museum. The quality, care and commitment of those involved in providing an effective resource for the education of young people is very evident, and the RAIC should be most proud of their work. The following is some suggestions on the utilization of this resource. Intended learning outcomes There are three major learning concepts presented within one resource –i.e., appreciation of the profession of architectural design, the development of the War Museum, and the Canadian role in the wars. The fourth outcome is the contribution all three make to our culture. They are all substantive and complex concepts on their own. However, in the context presented they are compatible and allow young people to develop the connections between the outcomes. By Cheryle Beaumont Superintendent of Schools Langley School District No. 35, Langley, B.C. The older and more sophisticated the student, the more seamless the connection and interdependence of the learning outcomes will be with the learner. The younger the student, the more the acquisition of these understandings will be singular. In the context of younger learners, this resource is appropriate, effective and I think enjoyable for young people. Age-appropriate application This resource is very appropriate for grades 6-12. Grades 6-8 will take it in at a more superfi cial level and will seize on one major concept at a time with the other two being incidental, not fundamental. As a vehicle to at least expose them to the profession of architecture that is not a bad thing. The other concepts (the war and the museum) are the most likely « hooks » for their teachers to get them to use the resource, as wellas for that group of students. 42 ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA For more information on Art in Architecture, or to order a copy, visit the Online Purchases section of www.raic.org or contact Denise MacDonald at dmacdonald@raic.org or 613.241.3600 ext. 205. Efficacy Senior Humanities and Fine Arts students (grades 9-12) could do much more with this opportunity. The resource contemplates the teaching being completed in a 75 minute lesson however, allowing for 2-3 lessons on this is both achievable and desirable. Taking more time with deeper questions that ask students to make connections between the three major themes in the DVD will offer the greatest chance of the most fundamental point the resource focuses on the appreciation of the process of architectural design to be established and embedded in their learning. The documentary itself copies and uses the design process architects Raymond Moriyama, FRAIC, and Alexander Rankin, FRAIC, discuss, and senior students need suffi cient refl ection time in order to come to those connections. The documentary In Search of a Soul, the core of the program, is an engaging and effective piece of work that could be very useful in schools for students and of benefi t to the profession of architecture. I enjoyed it very much and appreciated being able to review it. ■ The older and more sophisticated the student, the more seamless the connection and interdependence of the learning outcomes will be with the learner.
Reaching the future through the past Art in Architectureupdate By George E. Bemi, FRAIC When I helped develop and create the Art and Architecture kit over two years ago with the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC), I had no idea what to expect for the success of the project. It was the first time the RAIC created a program to reach out to young students. As evident by the article by Cheryle Beaumont on the previous page, it has been well received and this year we’ve been able to get it in the hands of teachers across the country for use in high school and junior high classrooms. We were inspired by the moving bilingual documentary In Search of a Soul : Building the Canadian War Museum which follows Architects Raymond Moriyama, FRAIC and Alexander Rankin, FRAIC through the conception, building, and signifi cance of a worldclass award-winning building in Ottawa. The documentary and the building were a perfect opportunity to convey the message that architecture matters and that the built environment is more than concrete and steel to the youth in Canada. With the help of the Ottawa Carleton District School Board we found that the program could easily be adapted to help teachers meet curricular guidelines in several subjects, including History, English, Visual Arts, Geometry, Philosophy, etc. (see « Building curriculum » in the Summer/Fall 2007 issue of Architecture for more). Since its inception, we have been disseminating the bilingual kit across the country. With a contribution from Veterans Affairs Canada in March, we were able to mail out 100 complimentary copies to English and French schools in all provinces and territories. A partnership I am particularly proud of is one we have developed this year with Historica Fairs. We first offered the kit as an award for the schools that won the essay competition at the local Ottawa Fair, and we were so impressed by the students’enthusiasm for History and learning, that we also participated in the Ontario provincial fair and the national fair in Victoria. These fairs create community and celebrate learning and are usually held in interesting spaces in their host cities. We hope to be involved with more fairs across Art in Architecture George E. Bemi, FRAIC (right) and Denise MacDonald, RAIC staff (left), awarding Art and Architecture kits to teachers at the Ottawa Regional Historica Fair the country next year. Maybe we will inspire students to present projects that explore Canadian History through its fascinating architectural history. We hope to reach more and more students and teachers this coming school year. We believethat through initiatives like this, the next The documentary and the building were a perfect opportunity to convey the message that architecture matters and that the built environment is more than concrete and steel to the youth in Canada. generation will one day support and maybe contribute to the building of inspired and sustainable cities and towns. ■ George E. Bemi is a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and the College of Fellows Chair for Ontario North East and Nunavut. He is a retired architect living in Ottawa. THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 43 www.raic.org/2009 PHOTO : CAROL WHITE



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