Architecture Canada n°6 1er semestre 2009
Architecture Canada n°6 1er semestre 2009
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°6 de 1er semestre 2009

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 52

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 3,5 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : l'Institut royal d'architecture du Canada.

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www.raic.org/2009 CJP ARCHITECTS LTD. | PHOTO : CJP ARCHITECTS LTD. High-Performance Schools Taylor Park Elementary explains Rayher, who adds that as a result of the savings with the HVAC system, « we were able to fund the construction of the two atria. » A computerized direct digital controls system also tracks and monitors the performance of the school’s mechanical and electrical systems. Completed in 2004, Taylor Park was a pilot project under the Green Buildings BC initiative and has achieved an energy-reduction rating of 45 per cent below the Model National Energy Code requirements. As a result, the school saves $16,000 and avoids emitting 38.1 metric tonnes of carbon dioxide every year. The school was also designed to « inspire, in both children and adults, an appreciation of the natural environment, » Rayher explains. Pods of classrooms are built around paved atria, which the 480 or so K-to-7 students can use as a play area on rain days. This Strassburger manufactures and supplies high-quality products for the replacement, renovation and new-construction markets. VINYL WINDOWS• ENTRANCE DOORS• SKYLIGHTS PH TECH PATIO DOORS• TERRACE & GARDEN DOORS 646 Colby Dr., Waterloo, Ontario N2V 1A2 (519) 885-6380 1-800-265-4717 Email : windows@strassburger.net strassburger.net Taylor Park Elementary rendering 288913_Strassburger.indd 20 ■ THE ROYAL 1ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE 10/11/06 DU CANADA 10:44:11 AM covered courtyard draws solar heat from its translucent ceiling, as wellas waste heat from the classrooms, and in turn sends natural ventilation to the classrooms. Every classroom also has windows on two walls to minimize the use of artifi cial light. Carbon dioxide and methane monitors ensure that the air is always clean. In other areas, point-of-use water heaters are located at each cluster of classrooms and washrooms to minimize domestic hot-water piping. Materials with recycled content were used for gypsum wallboard, ceiling tile, insulation and fl ooring. Recycled copper is also used in the piping for the water and heating systems. Meanwhile, the concrete used contains a lot of fl y ash, a waste material that displaces cement in the concrete mix. Rayher says that in the Vancouver area, cement manufacturing’s greenhouse gas emissions production rate is about 80 per cent of what vehicles produce in the region. In addition, site waste at the school waseither recycled or reused instead of placed in a landfill. Water won’t be wastedeither. There are low-fl ush toilets inside the school, and outside the native plants on the grounds require no irrigation. As Rayher explains : « With Taylor Park, we met the Green Buildings BC program’s targets of energy effi ciency and environmental sustainability. » ■ CJP ARCHITECTS LTD.
Through the process of BIM and integrated project delivery, structural and MEP engineers can avoid expensive clashes using Revit software and Autodesk NavisWorks software to analyze beams, pipes, HVAC, and electrical systems. All before ever breaking ground. autodesk.com/PowerofBIM Using building information modeling (BIM), architects, engineers and contractors can collaborate to make informeddesign and construction decisions much earlier in the process. By working together, architects and contractors can use management features to create accurate construction schedules and arrange necessary materials – so no one is left guessing. HOW BIM TAKES THE GUESSWORK OUT OF DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION.



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