Architecture Canada n°6 1er semestre 2009
Architecture Canada n°6 1er semestre 2009
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  • Parution : n°6 de 1er semestre 2009

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 52

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 3,5 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : l'Institut royal d'architecture du Canada.

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Mirabel High School The solution is in the details in Mirabel Over in Quebec, another high school, set for completion in November, is also aiming for LEED Silver. Under construction since August 2007, Mirabel High School would be the first school on the north shore of Montreal to receive the certifi cation. To vie for the LEED rating, the consortium of architects, Jean-Marc Coursol, Hébert- Zurita and Tremblay L’Écuyer, in association with LBHA and CIMA+ engineers, equipped the building with a geothermic-centralized heating system that integrates intelligent components as wellas a high-performance advanced building envelope, explains Maxime-KarlGilbert, director of sustainable development at Tremblay L’Écuyer Architectes Associés. The three-storey, 9,000-square-metre high school, which is part of the Rivière-du- Nord School Board and willaccommodate 850 students, is oriented in an east-west confi guration to take advantage of sunlight. Geothermic heat pumps draw energy from the ground to heat or cool the building throughout the year. A high-effi ciency natural gas boiler is used for condensation during peak hours, while an electric boiler is used for heating during off-peak hours. A thermal accumulator stores energy when rates are favourable. Meanwhile, a carbon-dioxide sensor is used to modulate the intake of fresh air based on the number of occupants in the building at any time. A thermal wheel recovers energy from « used » air to preheat the fresh air to be released in the school, says Gilbert, who holds a bachelor’s degree in architecture from the Université de Montréal. Motorized shutters in the ventilation ducts direct the air in occupied spaces while reducing the air intake in vacant rooms. LE GROUPE JEAN-MARC-COURSOL, HÉBERT-ZURITA, TREMBLAY L’ÉCUYER ARCHITECTES High-Performance Schools A computerized building management system (BMS) is also in place that enables the temperature to be controlled remotely. « In the winter, the temperature in the classrooms can be set so they go down during the night, to save on heating, and then rise so the rooms are comfortable when the students arrive in the morning, » explains Gilbert. As well, occupancy sensors turn the lights off when a room is empty. Low-fl ow toilets and urinals have been installed to save water usage. Gilbert says that while the exterior walls were built with insulated concrete forms to provide better insulation, the group of architects chose a white PVC roof membrane to refl ect most of the sunlight and prevent the school’s interior from overheating. High-effi ciency glass was also installed throughout the building and the south-facing agora was equipped with sunshades. To ensure minimal impact on the surrounding environment – and obtain LEED accreditation – Gilbert says that other measures were taken, including a dedicated area for recycling and the use of recycled materials during construction. In the end, Mirabel High’s energy effi ciency will be 43 per cent higher than the standard established by the Model National Energy Code. IRON EAGLE Industries Inc. Manufacturers of Ornamental Iron Fence Systems, the fence preferred by Canadian Architects since 1989. Iron Eagle offers over 62 unique designs for Commercial, Industrial and Residential applications• CAD drawings available on our website• 1256 Cardiff Blvd.• Mississauga, ON L5S 1R1 Tel. : (905) 670-2558• Fax : (905) 670-2841 www.ironeagleind.com• e-mail : info@ironeagleind.com THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 17 287853_IronEagle.indd 1 6/26/07 2:35:12 PM www.raic.org/2009



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Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 1Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 2-3Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 4-5Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 6-7Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 8-9Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 10-11Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 12-13Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 14-15Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 16-17Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 18-19Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 20-21Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 22-23Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 24-25Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 26-27Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 28-29Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 30-31Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 32-33Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 34-35Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 36-37Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 38-39Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 40-41Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 42-43Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 44-45Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 46-47Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 48-49Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 50-51Architecture Canada numéro 6 1er semestre 2009 Page 52