Architecture Canada n°5 2nd semestre 2008
Architecture Canada n°5 2nd semestre 2008
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°5 de 2nd semestre 2008

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 60

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 4,3 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : les bâtiments à haute performance atteignent de nouveaux sommets.

  • Prix de vente (PDF) : gratuit

Dans ce numéro...
< Pages précédentes
Pages : 40 - 41  |  Aller à la page   OK
Pages suivantes >
40 41
www.raic.org/2008 EQuilibrium Initiative « If the Now House system design is applied to all existing single-detached wartime houses in both countries, we have the potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions byup to 450 million tonnes annually. » As she points out, the Now House initiative also creates an opportunity to address the oft-overlooked issue of energy effi ciency on existing and – in the case of the project – older heritage homes. « In our case, we’re not trying to make the house look better inside. We’re trying to make it performbetter, » says Gauthier. « I’m invited to a lot of conferences where builders and contractors are still focused on new subdivisions and don’t talk about green homes when it involves renovations that can drastically reduce the amount of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions we generate in our cities. And what we’re getting back from surveys that we do is that residential homeowners are interested in making energy-effi cient changes to their homes. » In fact, so far more than 30 per cent of Topham Park homeowners have expressed Essential Elements of Successful Exteriors Overall Design Integrity System Selection 1 2 3 4 Enduring Material Quality Installation Know-How For over 30 years, Dryvit Systems Canada has been an integral part of your building envelope. We understand the connection between all the elements needed for the completion of a successful project. Dryvit Systems Canada, the Quintessential Element of Successful Exteriors 129 Ringwood Drive, Stouffville, Ontario L4A 8C1 Tel : 905. 642. 0444 info@dryvit.ca www.dryvit.ca 40 ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA 320062_Dryvit.indd 1 3/28/07 9:36:38 AM interest in making their domiciles more energy effi cient. The Now House project has also received similar feedback from wartime-home communities in Ottawa and Vancouver, as wellas south of the border in Indiana. Even Heritage Canada has taken note of the project, which helps to preserve – and improveupon – historic structures in a greenfriendly way. Now House is also in sync with Mayor David Miller’s « Change is in the Air » 2007 blueprint for making Toronto an urban eco-leader. The residential sector, according to the report, is responsible for one-quarter of the city’s GHG emissions. Now Houses, of course, would help reduce that carbon footprint. And by setting its own blueprint for the energy-effi cient retrofi t of Canada’s older or wartime homes – according to CMHC – « Now House is the start of a truly ambitious project – and a true onein-a-million home. » Top of the Annex A town house project, situated in downtown Toronto’s trendy Annex district, is no less singular in its design and intent. Another one of the dozen EQuilibrium projects is the Top of the Annex TownHomes. The project is a proposal for three town houses in Toronto by the Sustainable Urban Initiative (SUI) – a collaboration of consultants spearheaded by Lou Ampas, MRAIC, Architect, a principal with the newly created green Toronto firm, Coolearth Architecture Inc. and Ryerson University’s Faculty of Engineering, Architecture and Science – for builder-developer Spero Bassil. To comply with CMHC’s competition requirements, several design charettes were held, involving experts in integrated design and accredited professionals in the LEED greenbuilding rating system and addressing fi ve areas : health, energy, resources, environment and affordability. The three 220-square-metre (2,368- square-foot) town house units will include ground-source heat pumps powered by electricity generated through PV cells covering the roof of each unit. To pursue the goal of sustainable design in Toronto’s Annex, SUI’s vision involves creating urban infill that addresses the multifaceted goals of sustainable design, including urban intensifi cation – an important aspect of sustainable planning.
Recognizing the importance of limiting urban sprawl and green-fi eld development, the team seeks to demonstrate how to achievesustainable living and realize the netzero energy target in a small infillurban site. « We took this anti-urban approach to show that we can actually do infill green development, which we knew would be a challenge – especially to achievenet-zero energy, » says Architect Ampas. To do so, his team needed to make maximum use of active solar heating. The roofs of each of the three-and-ahalf-storey, three-bedroom units are almost entirely devoted to solar devices. A domestic hot-water system occupies about six square metres and a PV system covers about 44 square metres of each home, providing each town house with 6,271 kilowatt-hours of energy per year. The energy strategy was developed by the faculty and students at Ryerson, and led by Mark Gorgolewski, an associate professor in the Department of Architectural Science. A ground-source heat pump introduces very low temperature heat to the radiant fl oor heating system in the winter, while a direct expansion fan-coil system cools and dehumidifi es during the summer. Meanwhile, a time-of-use electric backup tank, used as part of the water heating, will be activated at night when electricity prices and energy demand are low, making less of an environmental impact as a result. The hotwater tank and ground source heat pump willalso be connected to the local utility so the equipment can be shut down when the load demand on the grid is high. To further reduce energy loads, the building was designed with high levels of insulation and a highly effi cient building envelope. Insulated concrete formwalls were used for foundation walls. Unit designs provide fl exible use of space with a top-down approach. « We fl ipped the design of the town houses, » explains Ampas. « We wanted to take maximum advantage of the passive solar design and to resolve the site constraints – directly to the south there is an existing building, and to the west, there are large shade-trees. « We felt the best way was to fl ip these units on their heads. This approach allows us to maximize the passive solar heating stored in the thermal massinside the building during the day. » He says the added benefit is that the top levels of the town house – the living, dining and kitchen areas where the main social activity occurs – receive maximum daylight. « Instead of having your sleeping quarters above the living areas, as you would in a typical unit, they’re located below, » says Ampas. EQuilibrium Initiative « We also situated the fl ex space below the bedroom level and closer to the street to give occupants the ability to have a selfcontained area. » He explains that the passive solar heat collected during the day and stored in the thermal mass of the town houses provides the bedrooms with heat during the evening hours. When there is a need for electricity, the grid is accessed during off-peak hours to take advantage of lower rates. State of the Earth Innovation Fire lanes | Parking Lots | Driveways Parking Lots | Trails | Access Roads Swales | Channels | Riverbanks Green Roofs | Foundation Drainage | Planters invisiblestructures.com 800-233-1510 THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 41 366703_Invisible.indd 1 4/21/08 7:07:14 PM www.raic.org/2008



Autres parutions de ce magazine  voir tous les numéros


Liens vers cette page
Couverture seule :


Couverture avec texte parution au-dessus :


Couverture avec texte parution en dessous :


Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 1Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 2-3Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 4-5Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 6-7Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 8-9Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 10-11Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 12-13Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 14-15Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 16-17Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 18-19Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 20-21Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 22-23Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 24-25Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 26-27Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 28-29Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 30-31Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 32-33Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 34-35Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 36-37Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 38-39Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 40-41Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 42-43Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 44-45Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 46-47Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 48-49Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 50-51Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 52-53Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 54-55Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 56-57Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 58-59Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 60