Architecture Canada n°5 2nd semestre 2008
Architecture Canada n°5 2nd semestre 2008
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°5 de 2nd semestre 2008

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 60

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 4,3 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : les bâtiments à haute performance atteignent de nouveaux sommets.

  • Prix de vente (PDF) : gratuit

Dans ce numéro...
< Pages précédentes
Pages : 20 - 21  |  Aller à la page   OK
Pages suivantes >
20 21
Create Distinction JELD-WEN WINDOWS & DOORS | What makes a house your home ? When it reflects your taste and your lifestyle. Flaunt your flair with JELD-WEN Windows and Doors. From craftsmanship you can see to details you can feel, like the security of a window latch that locks firmly or the way a well-crafted door opens and closes. Make it yours in subtle but important ways with the enduring quality and selection only JELD-WEN Windows and Doors can deliver. Visit www.jeld-wen.ca to learnmore about our options and warranty. 2008 JELD-WEN of Canada, Ltd. Willmar is a registered trademark of JELD-WEN of Canada, Ltd. Reliability for real life is a trademark of JELD-WEN, inc., Oregon, USA. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
be spreading mud and dirt throughout the rest of the building. Through all these measures, along with occupancy and photocell sensors used for artifi cial lighting, the Restoration Services Centre achieves a 66-per-cent reduction in total energy costs. It also uses 20 per cent of the natural gas, 70 per cent of the electricity and 20 per cent of the potable water (reduced through composting toilets, waterless urinals and ultra-low fl ow faucets and shower heads) of a similar structure built with conventional building practices. « The building is able to achievethose targets and be remarkably effi cient without having any incredibly advanced technology, » says Künzle. Water for non-potable use is drawn from four nearby ponds. Urinals and toilets are also used for return to maintain negative pressure and to prevent the escape of odours, which facilitates heat recovery of the composting process. Outside, storm-water drains the ponds, eliminating the need for stormsewers while contributing to the creation of a natural habitat for birds. (A plan to also connect a water main from one of the ponds to a hydrant, 400 metres away, was scotched by the local fi re department, TRCA : Natural light is reflected by the ceiling and penetrates deep into the space. which asked that the main be connected to the city grid.) Meanwhile, rainwater at the site is harvested from the roof and surface drainage is sent to the ponds, which supply water for non-potable use as wellas a future greenhouse that would support an aquatic-plant propagation program. As a result, no cistern is required for rainwater storage. There’s also no need for sanitary sewers, thanks to an on-site septic system for grey water. In terms of water conservation, the Restoration Services Centre will reduce consumption by an astounding 600 per cent – the same percentage realized in reduced natural-gas consumption. The building was also designed to accommodate future expansion. Provisions have been made to direct air through the trellised porch to heat a greenhouse and supply carbon dioxide for the proposed aquatic-plant propagation program. Vines growing along the trellis will provide a « green wall » – also an aesthetic benefi t for those inside the building looking out. High-performance buildings Meantime, the second-fl oor mezzanine can be confi gured to provide further offi ce space. Over 90 per cent of construction waste was diverted from the landfill. In addition, more than 20 per cent of materials, by cost, are regional – including concrete, insulation, gravel and landscaping – and over 15 per cent are from recycled sources, including concrete, gravel, steel, insulation, ceiling tiles, carpet, composite wood and drywall. For instance, rather than using asphalt, crushed concrete, in half-inch diameter pieces, was placed on top of gravel in the parking lot. « The surface doesn’t absorb heat and drainage is achieved through ground fi ltration, » says Künzle. He adds that recycled brick, taken from a century-old house in downtown Toronto, was used on the main entrance to bring character to the façade. The common thread in these highly effi - cient state-of-the-art buildings is an architecture that is a delight to behold and very functional, with an eye to savings for taxpayers and a benefi t for the environment. ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 21 ARCHITECT : MONTGOMERY SISAM ARCHITECTS INC./PHOTO : TOM ARBAN PHOTOGRAPHY www.raic.org/2008



Autres parutions de ce magazine  voir tous les numéros


Liens vers cette page
Couverture seule :


Couverture avec texte parution au-dessus :


Couverture avec texte parution en dessous :


Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 1Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 2-3Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 4-5Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 6-7Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 8-9Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 10-11Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 12-13Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 14-15Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 16-17Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 18-19Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 20-21Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 22-23Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 24-25Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 26-27Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 28-29Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 30-31Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 32-33Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 34-35Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 36-37Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 38-39Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 40-41Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 42-43Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 44-45Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 46-47Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 48-49Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 50-51Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 52-53Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 54-55Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 56-57Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 58-59Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 60