Architecture Canada n°5 2nd semestre 2008
Architecture Canada n°5 2nd semestre 2008
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°5 de 2nd semestre 2008

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 60

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 4,3 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : les bâtiments à haute performance atteignent de nouveaux sommets.

  • Prix de vente (PDF) : gratuit

Dans ce numéro...
< Pages précédentes
Pages : 18 - 19  |  Aller à la page   OK
Pages suivantes >
18 19
Panel Sour,ce Makes lt Easy. Saft\lvood Lumber • Plywood • Particleb,oard• MDF• Hardwood Plywood FSC Cenified• Urea Fonnaldehyde Free " Flre R etardant• ACQ Treat ed Tclll Fr eC ! : [87'7'].4.64- 7246 Fax : 1780• <1 19-23.4 5 W o b s i te : www.p 111no l sou reo. n o'l e- mait : i n f o@ pan : Jiso ur c:e. nel PANEL SOUR CE IN1TE : R 1NAT IONAL I N C
TRCA : On the north elevation, generous glazing allows penetration of indirect natural light. programming needs to be altered to ensure that the lights are only on when needed. Energy-use patterns, over the winter, were higher than expected, whereas during the summer, they were closer to their intended design. This, says Kato, may be the result of human behaviour as much as it involves the technology itself. Still, the Operations Centre refl ects its designer’s « true appreciation of the values anchoring the core principles of sustainability, » according to RAIC jury member Danny Pearl, in choosing the facility for last year’s Award of Excellence. « If all buildings and neighbourhoods could walk this tightrope between low and high tech, socio-economic constraints and contextual sensitivity, then the 2010 imperative and 2030 net-zero challenge [related to GHG emissions reductions] will in fact become more than simply an ecological response to climate change as we move towards a holistic model of the sustainable communities we one day hope to live in. » LEED standards set the pace To the east in Ontario, the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority’s (TRCA’s) new Restoration Services Centre in Vaughan – a suburb northwest of Toronto – was also granted LEED Platinum certifi cation last year by the Canada Green Building Council. No other Ontario building has received the Platinum designation, though the TRCA has two other buildings that reached LEED Gold status. The two-storey, 1,095-square-metre Restoration Services Centre opened last May and also won the Canadian Wood Council’s 2007 Ontario Wood WORKS ! Green Design Award. Home to the TRCA’s habitat regeneration and restoration projects, and a part of what is known as the « Living City Campus, » it has also been selected as the World Green Building Council’s secretariat. A blend of industrial and offi ce spaces, the centre serves as the hub for the TRCA’s nursery operations through which trees are cultivated and planted in the Greater Toronto Area. Designed by the Toronto firmMontgomery Sisam Architects Inc., the building consists mainly of wood framing with wood siding and some reclaimedbrick. Its east-west orientation maximizes the benefi ts of north and south exposures. The deep south-facing porch shields the windows from hot summer sun but allows the heat from the sun, when lower in the sky during the winter, into the building. Santiago Künzle, a partner with Montgomery Sisam and a member of the design team, says the TRCA wanted a green roof to reduce the heat-island effect. But following a consultation with team members, it was determined that such a roof would retain too much water and work against the goal of channelling as much water as possible to nearby ponds. Instead, a white membrane was placed on the roof that refl ects sunlight and reduces heat intake, and doesn’t retain water. Furthermore, the roof does not accommodate a single piece of equipment. « Except for exhaust pipes from the composting toilets, everything is in the basement, » says Künzle. « That minimizes the amount of penetration through the roof to prevent leaks. » Since it is a LEED-certifi ed building, the Restoration Services Centre also benefi ts from the energy-effi cient design, and thus, requires a smaller – and less expensive – mechanical plant. ARCHITECT : MONTGOMERY SISAM ARCHITECTS INC./PHOTO : TOM ARBAN PHOTOGRAPHY High-performance buildings With north-facing windows, extensive glazing and a narrow fl oor plate, there’s plenty of natural light and less of a need to rely on artifi cial lighting and cooling. In fact, the offi ce space can operate using only natural illumination, with every occupant within fi ve metres of an operable window. In addition, the building’s long vestibule ensures that the exterior door has closed before the interior door is opened, preventing the outside air from rushing into the building. A water-to-water, ground-source heat pump provides heating and cooling through a radiant concrete fl oor slab ; gas radiant tube heaters provide warmth to the garage while cooling is mainly supplied through chilled-water fan coils. Ventilation is also delivered in an innovative way. Two heat-recovery ventilators deliver 100-percent outdoor air throughout the building via a low-velocity displacement air-ventilation system. The fresh-air supply is tempered by reclaiming the heat from the exhaust air, the composting process and the heat-exchange fi eld. Before entering the building, the air is pre-heated in the winter and cooled during hot summer months. « The ventilation system is basically distributing fresh air at fl oor level where people are, rather than the conventional way of distributing it overhead, which requires much higher velocities of air and is more uncomfortable and drafty for occupants, » explains Künzle. « People barely notice the fresh air coming into the building. » Double-height offi ce space also allows for stratifi cation of warmair at the ceiling. Most of the ductwork is integrated with the slab-on-grade fl oor and insulation. A photovoltaic system provides the facility with some of its electricity, with the rest to be purchased, over a two-year period, from green, renewable energy supplier Bullfrog Power Inc. Meanwhile, a web-based building automation system monitors all essential systems and outdoor climatic conditions in real time. It integrates the control of heating, cooling and ventilation, as wellas measures and records building performance, including temperatures and humidity, ventilation rates, indoor-air quality, and electricity and water use. The project, which began in April 2006, was also designed to control dust, says Künzle. It’s quite straightforward : there are two separate offi ce spaces. One is for employees who work indoors. The other is for those who work outside or in the greenhouses and now won’t THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 19 www.raic.org/2008



Autres parutions de ce magazine  voir tous les numéros


Liens vers cette page
Couverture seule :


Couverture avec texte parution au-dessus :


Couverture avec texte parution en dessous :


Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 1Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 2-3Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 4-5Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 6-7Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 8-9Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 10-11Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 12-13Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 14-15Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 16-17Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 18-19Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 20-21Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 22-23Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 24-25Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 26-27Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 28-29Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 30-31Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 32-33Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 34-35Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 36-37Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 38-39Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 40-41Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 42-43Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 44-45Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 46-47Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 48-49Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 50-51Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 52-53Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 54-55Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 56-57Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 58-59Architecture Canada numéro 5 2nd semestre 2008 Page 60