Architecture Canada n°5 2nd semestre 2008
Architecture Canada n°5 2nd semestre 2008
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  • Parution : n°5 de 2nd semestre 2008

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 60

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 4,3 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : les bâtiments à haute performance atteignent de nouveaux sommets.

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Toronto and Region Conservation Authority : Top – Water for non-potable uses is drawn from nearby ponds ; Above – A deep overhang and trellises help to block the harsh summer sun. Munro praised design architect Ron Kato, MRAIC of the Vancouver-based firmLarry McFarland Architects Ltd. for employing « daylighting strategies, approaches to natural ventilation and air movement in the development of the building’s dominant section profi le. « Extensive use of B.C. wood [including western red cedar and Douglas fi r] throughout both the interior and exterior as structural elements and fi nishes, is in striking contrast to the raw metal used for the exterior building envelope and underside of the structural roof deck, resulting in a dynamic and exuberant expression. » Kato says that Parks Canada wanted a building that would serve as an example of responsible environmental management, ARCHITECT : MONTGOMERY SISAM ARCHITECTS INC./PHOTO : TOM ARBAN PHOTOGRAPHY and minimize both its dependence on outside energy sources and its environmental impact. « Parks Canada is probably the leading environmental agency in the country, and wanted to create a facility with a minimal ecological footprint to make a statement about its mandate as the steward of our national parks, » he explains. Natural resources available on site – from the ocean, sunlight and abundant rainfall – have been incorporated into the building systems. Rainwater collected off the roof is directed to a 30,000-litre underground storage tank. The water is used for fl ushing toilets and for wash-water needs in the marine operations area – while surplus rainwater passes through a sediment and oil separator before being discharged into the ocean. It’s expected that over 108,000 litres of rainwater will be harvested and used annually out of the more than 340,000 litres of annual rainwater falling onto the roof. This results in more than a 60-percent reduction in the use of potable water when compared to a building using conventional plumbing fi xtures. Furthermore, the volume of potable water used for the conveyance of sanitary waste is reduced by 98 per cent as a result of the use of rainwater for the building’s dual-fl ush toilets and as wash water in the marina. The 6- and 3-litre dual-fl ush ARCHITECT : MONTGOMERY SISAM ARCHITECTS INC./PHOTO : TOM ARBAN PHOTOGRAPHY system saves 67 per cent of water used when compared to a traditional 11-litre single-fl ush system. Meanwhile, the building – completed in less than 20 months – draws its heat from the ocean. Seawater is pumped into the building and passes through a heat exchanger and heat pumps to extract andupgrade the available heat energy. A system of plastic pipes embedded in the concrete fl oors is used to distribute heat around the building – a radiant heating and cooling system that signifi cantly reduces energy consumption. On the building’s roof, photovoltaic (PV) panels convert sunlight directly into electricity, providing for 20 per cent of the building’s energy needs. The system is also connected to BC Hydroto enable net metering. Inside, photosensors control lights adjacent to windows, while occupancy sensors turn off lights when there’s no one in a room. High-performance buildings The open-plan layout and atrium facilitate natural ventilation. All offi ces and workstations are located beside opening windows. Motorized ventilation louvres, at roof level and at each fl oor, open automatically when the building system senses that the outdoor-air temperature and conditions are appropriate. In addition, carbon-dioxide sensors are linked to the ventilation system. When an increased level of CO 2 is detected in a room, the building control system provides fresh air. In terms of conservation during construction, almost 90 per cent of all waste generated was diverted from landfill, and the value of recycled content of the building materials exceeded 27 per cent of the total cost of materials. Overall, the Gulf Islands Operations Centre will consume only about one quarter of the energy of a comparable building designed with conventional heating and mechanical systems, resulting in an annual reduction of 33.3 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions. The $4.5-million building has become so popular that guided tours of the facility are held once a month. Kato says that one of the architectural goals was to achievesustainable systems and components fully integrated within the building’s architectural expression. And the project continues. « The client gave us the rare opportunity to both review the performance of the building, and to recommend and take action as needed, » says Kato. McFarland Architects looked at the energy performance of the building to determine whether it is meeting its 75-per-cent energysavings cost objective. It wasn’t – so suggestions were made on how to ensure that it does. « There are a whole bunch of assumptions involved when you design these things – the hours of operation, the weather – all of which you consider when trying to fi gure out how a system will work over an entire year, » explains Kato. « Now we’re working backwards to see whether the systems in place are actually doing the job. » For instance, the lights are always on during the daytime, though the building was designed to prevent that from occurring. So Kato and his team have been looking at the photosensors to determine whether they have been properly positioned or whether the THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 17 www.raic.org/2008



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