Architecture Canada n°5 2nd semestre 2008
Architecture Canada n°5 2nd semestre 2008
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  • Parution : n°5 de 2nd semestre 2008

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 60

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 4,3 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : les bâtiments à haute performance atteignent de nouveaux sommets.

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ARCHITECT : LARRY MCFARLAND ARCHITECTS LTD./2006 DEREK LEPPER Gulf Islands National Park Reserve, clockwise from top : South elevation at dusk ; Southeast elevation ; cross-view « One building can’t turn everything around, but it can make a big difference, » observes Kuwabara. « Bringing 2,000 people into downtown Winnipeg at this moment in time is going to have a huge benefi t in terms of urban revitalization. « It will cause a lot of complaints when people start paying for parking or don’t like riding buses, but that’s part of urban change. A lot of younger people from Manitoba Hydrowill live downtown because of the building. » And employees will have plenty of opportunities to socialize at work. Most of the offi ce space is open-concept and the atria can be used for staff meetings. The building is organized into three-storey « workplace neighbourhoods. » Two of them are served by one of the south atria – the so-called lungs of the building that formpart of the natural ventilation system. Ultimately, Manitoba Hydro’s new head offi ce achieves fi ve objectives, according to Kuwabara. It creates both a supportive workplace environment for the employees and sustainable ARCHITECT : LARRY MCFARLAND ARCHITECTS LTD./2006 DEREK LEPPER design that will lead to a 60-per-cent reduction in energy use and, at a minimum, a LEED Gold rating – if not the goal of a LEED Platinum designation. The project was also able to develop signature architecture integrated throughout the building at different scales, from street level to the roof. It also attained a high level of urban design integration to revitalize the downtown and a costeffective building design that provides Manitoba Hydrowith benefi ts in terms of comfort, operations and maintenance. As Kuwabara told the German magazine XIA IntelligenteArchitektur earlier this year : « The integrated design process was essential to achieveour creative breakthroughs and innovation. The tools to model and explore alternatives had to be sophisticated to address advanced concepts, including daylight autonomy, radiant cooling and heating, geothermal systems, operable windows and hybrid ventilation, and highperformance curtain walland building envelope design. » Manitoba Hydrohas also established a 60-year fi nancing framework. High-performance buildings « Most developers are looking for a return payout in a much shorter period of time, but you can’t think like that, » says Kuwabara. « Over 60 years, the benefi ts of sustainability far outweigh capital or operating costs. » The new building is expected to save the Crown Corporation about $15 million in annual operating costs, including an estimated $7 million in annual lease costs by amalgamating the dozen satellite offi ces under one roof. « Manitoba Hydrowas so involved in this project, » says Kuwabara, « and from the very beginning, they placed the user – the employees – as the central fi gure in the life of the building. » Making adjustments for reality Over on the West Coast, Parks Canada can now boast having one of the country’s most advanced environmentally sustainable buildings with a new marine-support operations and administrative centre for Gulf Islands National Park Reserve in British Columbia. Located on Vancouver Island in Sidney, B.C., the three-storey facility made history shortly after it opened in late 2005 when it was awarded a LEED Platinum rating and became the first Canadian building to achievethis level of sustainability, and the first federal building to achievethe LEED Gold or higher standard suggested by Public Works and Government Services Canada. In 2007, the Operations Centre was awarded the RAIC’s first Award of Excellence in the « Green Building » category. « The project clearly demonstrated an architectural design approach to the integration of sustainable design principles, executed at a high level in all categories : site planning, water effi ciency, energy effi ciency and renewable energy, conservation of materials and resources, and indoor environmental quality, » said architect Neil Munro, FRAIC, a member of the RAIC’s awards jury. On an annual basis, the building is designed to save 75 per cent in energy costs and achieve49 per cent in energy-intensity savings. THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 15 ARCHITECT : LARRY MCFARLAND ARCHITECTS LTD./2006 DEREK LEPPER www.raic.org/2008



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