Architecture Canada n°4 1er semestre 2008
Architecture Canada n°4 1er semestre 2008
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  • Parution : n°4 de 1er semestre 2008

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 52

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www.raic.org/2008 Toronto architects help bring police back brick was restored. In addition, the roof was replaced and the original wood windows were refurbished. A lot of often painstakingly intricate work was involved in rejuvenating the building and site. Fortunately, the Stantec team had key allies on the project. Toronto-based E.R.A. Architects Inc. contributed their expertise in heritage restoration, while the TPS provided valuable input, says Moxam. « The great thing about working with police groups is that they’re very organized and they know how they need to work. So you can in turn collaborate with them to develop a very functional and efficient space for them, and in this case, also contribute something positive to the public realm in a socially and economically diverse part of the city. » Moxam has considerable experience working in the law enforcement sector. He helped design the building for one of Halton Regional Police’s divisions as wellas 38 ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ARCHITECT : STANTEC ARCHITECTURE/PHOTO : RICHARD JOHNSON, INTERIOR IMAGES the Ontario Provincial Police headquarters in Orillia, done in joint venture with W.M. Salter and Associates Ltd. « All of these projects subscribe to the idea of reinventing the established idea of what a police station should look like, » says Moxam. « In the past, they’ve often had the appearance of a fortress. So we tried to develop an architectural image that’s very community friendly, very inviting and not something that’s threatening – even though it has everything a police station needs from a security point of view. « It has to be something that becomes a real part of the community and not something that’s going to separate it from the community. » And the 51 Division project itself proved to be a community effort of sorts. Moxam says about 20 different groups within the TPS – from detectives and community patrol officers to the folks working in forensics, security and building maintenance – were involved at the design stage. Working with the detectives was « interesting, » explains Moxam. « We and the leadership of the police were really promoting an open-office work
ARCHITECT : STANTEC ARCHITECTURE/PHOTO : RICHARD JOHNSON, INTERIOR IMAGES environment and traditionally detectives worked in closed offices in the old 51 Division building. » « They would actually bring prisoners from their cells to their office space – and you can only imagine what a huge security problem that created in the building. » Today, the detectives work within an open-concept setting. Says Moxam : « They resisted it at first, but now totally love it. » There is also more security surrounding detainees and suspects. Interview rooms 342414 Nordic 1/2h Toronto architects help bring police back are now housed in the same secure block as the 24 detention cells. For its unique design, the 51 Division project has received both a Canadian Architect Award of Merit and the American Institute of Architects Justice Facilities Review Certificate of Merit and more recently, a 2007 Ontario Association of Architects Award for Design Excellence. The relatively new police presence in Corktown has inspired both commercial and residential development around it, explains Moxam. As he wrote earlier this year in the AAJ (Academy of Architecture for Justice) Journal : « The broader, more urban-oriented approach to the design of 51 Division has generated a new understanding of how derelict urban sites can be recycled in a positive manner, and how careful consideration of public space relative to the immediate program can have an influence well beyond its own site boundaries. » ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 39 342414_Nordic.indd 1 8/20/07 11:38:43 AM www.raic.org/2008



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