Architecture Canada n°4 1er semestre 2008
Architecture Canada n°4 1er semestre 2008
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  • Parution : n°4 de 1er semestre 2008

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 52

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 3,0 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : raviver l'économie des collectivités.

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There are also aesthetic features that brightenup the municipal building. The galvanized aluminum used to clad the building reflects light, and the green-blue pattern of the curtain-wall glass on the south has a « shimmering of water » effect. Calgary’s largest green-building office building to date, the Water Centre’s design was left in the hands of the experts, explains engineer Russ Golightly, the city’s project manager for sustainable building infrastructure and an LEED -accredited professional. « We allowed the architecture to happen from the perspective that paid professionals WWhile sustainable buildings are poppingup on Calgary’s landscape and existing historic structures are being refurbished in Halifax, Quebec City has been the site of a long-termdowntown revitalization involving the old and the new. Once a bustling 19th-century working-class, industrial district that featured a tannery, sawmilland brassiere-and-corset factory that in more recent years degenerated into one of Quebec City’s roughest neighbourhoods, quartier Saint- Roch has been transformedinto a dynamic arts-and-culture district as a result of an urban renewal program called RevitalizAction, which the city implemented in 1992. The driving force behind the revitalization strategy was Quebec City’s former and four-termmayor Jean-Paul L’Allier. He opposed a plan promoted by his predecessor to develop Saint-Roch along the model of a « traditional American downtown area with shopping centres, » according to architect and urban planner Serge Viau, who serves as Quebec City’s deputy city manager. He says the City hired the Montreal architecture firm, Groupe Cardinal Hardy, to establish guidelines for Saint-Roch’s development. gave me their opinion as to what was needed, » he explains. « Normally, architects build on the opinion of the clients they’re working for, and my client, the City, would have expected us to build a 10- storey tower or a very large five-storey box. » In turn, the architects involved in the fouryear project appreciated Golightly’s approach. « The client was fantastic, » says Jeremy Sturgess, FRAIC, the principal of Sturgess Architecture. « Russ Golightly was a torch of wisdom and we couldn’t have progressed anywhere where we got to without him. » La ville de Québec revitalized ARCHITECT : GROUPE CARDINAL HARDY/PHOTO : CLAUDEL HUOT The idea was to preserve the historic flavour of the area while breathing new life into it. « We wanted to revamp the whole area and I think we succeeded in that, » says Viau, whose official title is adjunct director general of sustainable development responsible for urban planning, economic development, environment, engineering and public works for the City of Québec. The municipal government has a strong presence in Faubourg Saint-Roch, having relocated the city’s economic development and city planning departments in the La Fabrique building – the old Dominion Corset factory. Cultural organizations are housed in the Centre de production artistique et culturelle Alyne-Lebel in a former building owned by the provincial government. Also there is Méduse, a multi-arts complex consisting of 10 arts companies covering photography, video production, graphic arts and which includes a Architectural revitalization Sturgess describes the designing of the Water Centre as a « collaborative process » and credits Calgary’s water and wastewater services staff with not only « embracing » the architectural vision but also becoming « champions of it. » He adds that Dominion Construction, which built the Water Centre, « totally gets it » when it came to following a sustainabledesign model. « The fact that they had to recycle the construction waste on the site and it didn’t slow them down reinforced the collaborative effort. » radio station, live-performance theatre and living accommodations for visiting artists. Saint-Roch is now also home to Laval University’s school of visual arts as wellas an arts and crafts centre that brings together schools for ceramics, sculpture, textiles and bookbinding. THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 21 ARCHITECT : GROUPE CARDINAL HARDY/PHOTO : CLAUDEL HUOT ARCHITECT : GROUPE CARDINAL HARDY/PHOTO : CLAUDEL HUOT www.raic.org/2008



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