Architecture Canada n°4 1er semestre 2008
Architecture Canada n°4 1er semestre 2008
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°4 de 1er semestre 2008

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 52

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 3,0 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : raviver l'économie des collectivités.

  • Prix de vente (PDF) : gratuit

Dans ce numéro...
< Pages précédentes
Pages : 18 - 19  |  Aller à la page   OK
Pages suivantes >
18 19
339671 Panel Source p.18
with natural light, and open-plan offices provide outside views to the north and the south. The building is four storeys at the west end and features an atrium that connects the previously distinct departments ; a green roof covers the one-storey operational wing to reduce overheating. To satisfy the requirements of Calgary’s Sustainable Building Policy, The Water Centre is completely day-lit, and sets forward several CANADIAN COPPER & BRASS DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION Toll Free : 1-877-640-0946 Fax : 416-391-3823 E-mail : coppercanada@onramp.ca Web site : www.coppercanada.ca ARCHITECT : GIBBS GAGE ARCHITECTS target goals as compared to measurable standards, including:• a 58-per-cent savings in annual energy use estimated at $108,000 per year ; • a water-use reduction of 59 per cent ; • a 72-per-cent reduction in waste water ; • a 95-per-cent recycling rate of excess construction material spared from transport to a landfill site ; and• a reduction of 800 metric tonnes of carbon dioxide, the equivalent to about 323941 Canadian Copper & Brass Architectural revitalization 430 fully inflated hot air balloons not entering the atmosphere. To achievethese targets, the design team had to be innovative. For instance, radiant ceiling slab cooling is used in combination with under-floor ventilation. Evaporative cooling is employed in the air-handling units to minimize the amount of mechanical cooling. Heat recovery is also facilitated in allair-handling units. As a result, the amount of heating and cooling systems can be adjusted manually. In addition, rainwater from the roof will be collected and used for plant irrigation. Recycled water is used for all toilet flushing. As well, over 700,000 kilograms of the reinforcing steel used was recycled. Copper... The Green Choice It’s Old. It’s New. It’s Copper. In an age when renewable resources have never been more crucial, copper has long been a leader. Copper has been used for more than 10,000 years, and it’s 100% recyclable. Copper also has the enviable reputation 1/2h of having an exceptionally long service life, for roofing, cladding, and other architectural applications. The long life span, aesthetic appeal and recyclability of copper make it a prime choice for architectural projects around the world. Contact us for your free « Consider the Possibilities » CD portraying striking examples of outstanding applications of copper in architecture. It’s a fascinating trip you will not want to miss. T H E C O P P E R D I S C Consider The Possibilities in Architecture THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 19 323941_Canadian.indd 1 4/3/07 8:14:33 AM ARCHITECT : GIBBS GAGE ARCHITECTS www.raic.org/2008



Autres parutions de ce magazine  voir tous les numéros


Liens vers cette page
Couverture seule :


Couverture avec texte parution au-dessus :


Couverture avec texte parution en dessous :


Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 1Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 2-3Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 4-5Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 6-7Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 8-9Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 10-11Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 12-13Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 14-15Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 16-17Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 18-19Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 20-21Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 22-23Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 24-25Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 26-27Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 28-29Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 30-31Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 32-33Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 34-35Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 36-37Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 38-39Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 40-41Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 42-43Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 44-45Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 46-47Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 48-49Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 50-51Architecture Canada numéro 4 1er semestre 2008 Page 52