Architecture Canada n°4 1er semestre 2008
Architecture Canada n°4 1er semestre 2008
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  • Parution : n°4 de 1er semestre 2008

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 52

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 3,0 Mo

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TTo the west, new municipal buildings are required to be green. In 2003, Calgary became the first Canadian municipality to adopt a Sustainable Building Policy advocated by long-time ecofriendly Alderman Bob Hawkesworth. The policy states that city facilities are to be « designed, developed and operated to provide leadership in the conservation, protection, improvement and sustainability of the environment for the benefit of Calgarians. » New buildings or renovations of occupied facilities over 500 square metres must meet or exceed the silver-level rating of the green Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED ) system. Hawkesworth – a former member of Alberta’s Legislative Assembly who holds a landmarks, Lydon Lynch has played one of the lead roles in revitalizing the southern end of Halifax’s waterfront – an area along Piers 20 to 23 known as the Seaport. MacKay-Lyons Sweetapple (MLS) Architects Ltd. has also been involved in developing the Halifax Port Authority seawall. In 2005, the Halifax-based firmwas chosen to design a new oceanside campus for NSCAD University – formerly known as the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design – in one of the old warehouse buildings along the waterfront long used by the arts community as studio space. « The development of this area required a vision that continued to foster the arts and bring a public connection to the waterfront, » explains architect Peter Blackie, senior project manager with MLS Architects. « This new facility represents a visceral connection between the arts and the industrial aesthetic, and serves as a catalyst for this rapidly changing cultural district of the city. » NSCAD University’s new $14-million port campus is located in the two-storey Shed 21, which also houses the Pier 21 centre. Within the new 6,500-square metre campus, almost three-quarters of the existing space for the project were renovated, while the remainder consists of a new addition. The renovated area includes 13 bays of the existing shed that will house many of the university’s more industrial program components, including sculpture and ceramic studios, wood and metal shops, a foundry and a product-design area. To bridge the link between water and land, MLS designed two facades. One is oriented toward the edge of Halifax’s downtown area, where NSCAD University’s original stone-ironconcrete-brick campus has been located since the institution’s establishment (as the Victoria School of Art and Design) in 1887. The other facade faces Halifax Harbour. « We openedup the wall so that when you’re in the space on the harbour side, it feels as if you’re right on the water, » explains Blackie. Calgary – sustainability a must ! ARCHITECT : LYDON LYNCH ARCHITECTS LTD. master’s degree in resources and the environment from the University of Calgary – says the inspiration to formthe policy came from former RAIC president Vivian Manasc, PP/FRAIC, whose Edmonton-based firmis renowned for its focus on sustainable architecture. Six years ago, he attended a symposium on sustainable buildings organized by Manasc Isaac Architects and Climate Change Central, a non-profit organization established in 2000 by the Alberta government to lead action on climate change and of which Hawkesworth is a founding director. « I heard a presentation from the City of Seattle about its green ARCHITECT : GIBBS GAGE ARCHITECTS ARCHITECT : LYDON LYNCH ARCHITECTS LTD. Architectural revitalization « The idea behind it is to provide the best address potentially in the province for working artists to dialogue from the water to the building. » He says the vision promoted by Brian MacKay-Lyons, FRAIC – who founded the firmin 1985 – was to balance the old with the new. « He wanted to keep the qualities of the monumentality of this robust structure with its large, grand open spaces, while at the same time, having the functionality it required, » explains Blackie. « Adding a component for gallery space allowed us to fully exploit the existing qualities of the old building without changing it. » NSCAD’s port campus features six-metre ceilings, plenty of natural lighting and « an uninterrupted view » – as the university boasts – of the harbour from the second- and thirdfloor studios through a glass curtain running along the entire length of the north side. The 60-metre-long gallery, in the new addition, faces the land on the city side of the campus. Says Blackie : « Our urban design challenge was to convert this old, underused portion of waterfront real estate into a very vibrant and lively component of a growing arts district. » NSCAD U’s waterfront campus is also green, with 19 ground-source pumps providing heating and cooling, and sensors lowering the temperature and lighting in sections of the complex not in use. policy and that all city buildings had to have a LEED standard, » he explains. « It seemedlike such a great idea tome that I brought a notice of motion to Calgary’s city council and it endorsed it. And as soon as the city adopted that policy, it had a transformative THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 15 www.raic.org/2008



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