Architecture Canada n°4 1er semestre 2008
Architecture Canada n°4 1er semestre 2008
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  • Parution : n°4 de 1er semestre 2008

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 52

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 3,0 Mo

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www.raic.org/2008 Architectural revitalization Architectural revitalization and green buildings brings new economic life to communities By Christopher Guly Halifax – a salvage piece of Canada’s history In helping to highlight a piece of important Canadian history, Lydon Lynch Architects Ltd. itself made history. The Halifax-based architectural firmled the design and renovation of the interpretation centre at Pier 21, a national historic site that was judged to be one of Canada’s « seven wonders » from a nationwide poll conducted by CBC this year. Most significantly, Pier 21 was the only building to make the list and join such other natural Canadian wonders as Niagara Falls, the Rockies and the Prairie skies. « It’s a cool thing for architects to brag about, » says Andy Lynch, FRAIC, a senior partner in the firm. « This is a building that has an emotional connection to a great many people in Canada. » In 2001, Attractions Canada honoured Pier 21 with the « best new attraction » award in the country. From 1928 to 1971, Pier 21 served as Canada’s Ellis Island, welcoming over one million immigrants, refugees, troops, wartime evacuees, displaced persons, war brides and their children. During the Second World War, half a million Canadians passed through Pier 21 to serve overseas. In 1999, Canada’s last remaining ocean immigrant shed was reopened following a $10- million refurbishment project funded by the Federal Government and the private sector and in which Lydon Lynch played a major role. The firmdesigned and renovated the 5,574- square-metre exhibition facility within the historic Pier 21 sheds on the Halifax waterfront. Occupying portions of sheds 21 and 22, the centre includes a central welcome pavilion ; immigration exhibition hall housing a multimedia theatre and exhibits ; multicultural performance halland a gift shop. The Rudolph P.Bratty Hall – the centrepiece of Pier 21 – features multimedia exhibits that follow the immigrant experience through their cross-Atlantic voyage, arrival and processing at Canada’s waterfront door, and subsequent journey across the country. The KennethC. Rowe Heritage Hall, where multicultural performances are held, features a raised stage with fully equipped and professionally designed acoustics, lighting and sound systems. Floor-to-ceiling windows overlook the Halifax Harbour and a vaulted ceiling rises from five to nine metres. A research centre was recently added, along with a 464-square-metre Harbourside Gallery that will host travelling and special exhibitions on themes related to Canadian immigration and nation building. The long-termplan is to make Pier 21 Canada’s national immigration museum, given the site’s history of serving as the gateway to and from which newcomers and Canadians passed through over many decades. « Millions of stories have been told about how people’s lives have been affected by Pier 21 – it’s really a matter of ‘if the walls could « The idea behind it is to provide the best address potentially in the province for working artists to dialogue from the water to the building. » 12 ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ARCHITECT : LYDON LYNCH ARCHITECTS LTD. talk,’ » explains Lynch, whose father boarded a ship from there to serve in the Second World War and later returned there at war’s end. « Pier 21 is allabout the stories and less about the architecture – we were more on the periphery. « We were dealing with the existing waterfront and warehouses that had played this role in welcoming to Canada millions of people over the years. « There’s very little new architecture there. We just tried to work with what was there. » Yet by helping to preserve and highlight one of Canada’s most precious historical
ARCHITECT : LYDON LYNCH ARCHITECTS LTD. ARCHITECT : LYDON LYNCH ARCHITECTS LTD. ARCHITECT : LYDON LYNCH ARCHITECTS LTD. Architectural revitalization THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 13



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