Architecture Canada n°3 2nd semestre 2007
Architecture Canada n°3 2nd semestre 2007
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  • Parution : n°3 de 2nd semestre 2007

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 56

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 5,2 Mo

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www.raic.org/2007 Innovative Design Stephen Teeple, FRAIC, president of Teeple Architects, explains that his firmsought to « break down scale and create landscapes » at Thorncliffe Park Public School, which is situated in the northeast Toronto district of Flemington Park, a relatively poor area that is home to a sizable immigrant and Muslim Asian population. He says the idea of creating modules of social groupings interacting with one another was inspired by the « labyrinthine clarity » approach taken by the late Dutch architect Aldo van Eyck more than 40 years ago with his famous Amsterdam orphanage, which, according to Artandculture.com, « created a web-like structure of small pavilions, each looking into a private courtyard. » At Thorncliffe, there are nine courtyards, « organized along the north-south axis as parallel worlds, with myriad personalities defined by the plantings, the furnishings or play structures, » as Rochon described in her Globe article. It also covers the most fashionable buildings. HANSONBRICK.COM 1.800.263.6229 20 ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA 301570_hanson.indd 1 9/25/06 10:12:18 AM Wrote Rochon, who holds a master’s degree in urban design studies from the University of Toronto, where she has also served as an adjunct professor in the faculty of architecture, landscape and design : « Teeple Architects has made two major interventions, both of which are designed to nurture the young creative mind. « The first is to return the urban child to nature, a Rousseauian gesture, to bring something tactile and alive to the children. The other is to bathe the children in diffused shafts of colour. « Because all of this has been accomplished for $12 million — which works out to $146 per square foot, the [Toronto District] School Board’s standard — Thorncliffe establishes a new benchmark for school design in Canada. » Previously, the firmin conjunction with Toronto-based Shore Tilbe Irwin & Partners designed Eglinton Spectrum Public School — a $6.7-million, 5,607-square-metre project completed in September 1999, which earned an honourable mention at the 2000 City of Toronto Architecture & Urban Design Awards in the « element or building » category. Working with the school board, teachers and members of the community, the architectural team maximized space at the busy Toronto intersection site by pushing the L-shaped school out to the sidewalk and thus, enabled more space for outdoor play in an area facing south, away from traffic. Among the other highlights of the 20-classroom facility are a library built around a restored entry portal from the original, early 20th-century-built school, and multistorey, skylit atrium spaces from which there are views to all three floors of the school. Teeple Architects’latest project for the Toronto District School Board is Brookside Public School, which is set to open in September and which will qualify for the Canada Green Building Council’s LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Gold performance rating (see sidebar on page 17). Accommodating 625 students from kindergarten to grade 8, the new 6,074-square-metre building will be integrated with the natural environment of the nearby Rouge River ecosystem and will be one of Canada’s most energyefficient schools. As with École Allain St-Cyr in Yellowknife, Brookside willuse a displacement ventilation
system. There willalso be courtyards to expand the use of natural daylight for the school’s interior. The school is also equipped for a photovoltaic array to capture solar energy — an initiative that could not only make Brookside self-sustaining in its electrical consumption, but could also give it an LEED Platinum rating. While Brookside aspires to nationwide recognition for its energy efficiency, École du Tournant has already attained an important distinction in Quebec. Casting (Day)light on Scholastic Achievement In 1999 the U.S. firmof Heschong Mahone Group (HMG) undertook a study to quantify the effects of daylighting on human performance. HMG analyzed student performance data from three school districts looking for a link between the amount of daylight provided by each student’s classroom and scholastic achievement. « They reasoned that if the physical environment truly affects student performance, then they could best establish such a correlation in an elementary school setting, with its uniform‘givens’such as standardized testing and a single instructor and location. » Analysis included mathematics test scores, student body demographics, a review of architectural plans, aerial photographs, and records of building maintenance, among other data. Following a visit, each classroom was assigned a daylight code that represented the quality of the daylighting. The results were impressive, indicating that students with the most daylighting progressed 20 per cent faster in mathematics, and 26 per cent faster in reading. Other results showed that skylights and operable windows also improved test scores. «... the demonstrated consistency of students’improved testing because of better and increased daylighting in their classrooms in all three districts cannot be ignored. The researchers were very careful to note that the three test districts had very different criteria, teaching styles, building designs, and, above all, climates. Nevertheless, the results of these studies showed a very positive and significant correlation between better and more daylighting and scholastic improvement... » Daylighting Performance and Design, Gregg D. Ander, John Wiley and Sons, Inc. 2006 South Calgary High School interior Innovative Design THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 21 ARCHITECT/PHOTO : COHOS EVAMY INTEGRATED DESIGN www.raic.org/2007



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