Architecture Canada n°3 2nd semestre 2007
Architecture Canada n°3 2nd semestre 2007
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  • Parution : n°3 de 2nd semestre 2007

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 56

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 5,2 Mo

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www.raic.org/2007 Innovative Design « There is natural light in all places so lights can be turned off during the day, » says Cinnamon. « A lot of it has to do with how spaces are oriented within the building envelope. » The school’s design is also based on tradition and efficiency. Two colours of brick (the famous school colours, red and buff) along with coloured concrete block and Galvalume corrugated metal siding are « enduring and durable materials » that are featured inside the building. To the east in Toronto, Teeple Architects Inc. has designed schools following a sustainability model based on social and environmental perspectives. With Thorncliffe Park Public School — North America’s largest elementary school — Teeple Architects was responsible for a massive $12-million, 12,663-square-metre expansion completed in 2003 to replace a village of 46 portables arrayed in the schoolyard and accommodate the school’s burgeoning population. (As of last spring 18 ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA there were 1,667 students, of which 1,231 were enrolled in junior kindergarten to grade 3.) The primary motivation of the design was to create « an enriched learning environment, filled with light, space and colour, » according to Teeple’s backgrounder on the project. « As children move through the school, they encounter an unfolding experience of views to long exterior gardens, light-filled public spaces and brightly coloured shafts of light that penetrate through both floors of the school. » The new addition, which more than doubles the space of the original school, is organized as two bars : one contains the library, a courtyardlike space in the school’s centre, and the other bar features classrooms — organized into clusters of four around a small gathering space — with linear gardens running between each bar. Students in every classroom of the twostorey school have direct or visual access to an interior courtyard or the playground, as Globe and Mail architecture critic Lisa Rochon pointed out in a 2003 article on the school. « The scale of the new addition is residential and inviting, » she wrote, highlighting the windows that « punch out from the elevation as a series of bays » and « white stucco cladding set against thin vertical members of cedar and buff-coloured bricks. « Thorncliffe communicates as a school that wants to delight and nurture its students. That’s what separates it cleanly from all of the heavyset, oppressive institutions that have been constructed in this country. » Looking South for Great Examples Great Schools by Design is a national initiative of the American Architectural Foundation that seeks to improve the quality of U.S. schools and the communities they serve by promoting collaboration, excellence and innovation in school design. The AAF is a national nonprofit organization that educates individuals and communities about the power of architecture to transformlives and improve the places where we live, learn, work, and play. Great Schools by Design is just one of its initiatives that serve to help people become thoughtful and engaged stewards of the world around them. To learnmore — see www.archfoundation.org.
South Calgary High School, boasting a central street or spine that runs along both floors, like a small-scale mall where students can meet. Innovative Design THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 19• ARCHITECT/PHOTOS : COHOS EVAMY INTEGRATED DESIGN www.raic.org/2007



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