Architecture Canada n°3 2nd semestre 2007
Architecture Canada n°3 2nd semestre 2007
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°3 de 2nd semestre 2007

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 56

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 5,2 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : des écoles novatrices.

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ARCHITECT : COHOS EVAMY INTEGRATED DESIGN Schematic sketch of South Calgary High School. To reduce labour costs, which can be extraordinarily high in the North, the steelframe structure and steel decking are exposed in various parts of the building, and together with the exposed granite give it a natural rockhewn look. In addition, the structure is insulated on the outside to provide a tight building envelope — and reduce heating costs — while most of the lighting is fluorescent to facilitate lowpower consumption. Unique, practical and sustainable, École Allain St-Cyr is part of a trend that’s resulting in excellence in school designs across the country. Like Allain St-Cyr, Calgary’s Centennial High School (now renamedSouth Calgary High School) focuses on gathering spaces to encourage a sense of community. Completed for the Calgary Board of Education in September 2004 (nine months ahead of schedule and $5 million under the $27-million budget), the two-storey, 13,800-squaremetre structure was built to accommodate 1,800 students. But rather than have everyone crammedtogether, three wings — or pods — were each created for the grades 10, 11 and 12 students « to have three communities of 600, and try to give them an identity within that structure, » says Doug Cinnamon, the project architect and a partner with the firm, Cohos Evamy Integrated Design, in Calgary. He explains that a « central street or spine » runs along both floors of the school in an eastwest orientation. « It really works more like a mall, but on a smaller scale, where students can meet, » says Cinnamon. This common gathering place connects to the three sets of classroom pods — divided by outdoor courtyards — all of which are located in the south end of the school. « It is in the space between the classroom and the public realm where the most interesting interaction takes place, » explains Cinnamon. « Students feel comfortable there because there is a bit of elbow room and there are always people around. It is the building’s key to success. » He adds that the area that includes the cafeteria and central street provides « a sense of community, safety and understanding of where you are at all times. » And « people like to be there, » in large part because of the quality of lighting throughout the building. Innovative Design DID YOU KNOW ? The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Canada Rating System recognizes leadingedge buildings that incorporate design, construction and operating practices that combine healthy, highquality and high-performance advantages with reduced environmental impacts. LEED certified buildings meet the highest environmental performance standards in Canada. The point-based system covers six areas : site development, water and energy efficiency, material selection, indoor air quality and innovation of design. There are now 44 LEED certified projects in Canada with more than 260 registered under the LEED system — and this number is growing rapidly. LEED systems for New Construction and Major Renovations (LEED Canada-NC) and LEED Canada for Commercial Interiors (LEED Canada-CI) are now in place. Systems for low-rise residential projects and sustainable communities are currently under development. The Canada Green Building Council is working in collaboration with a number of local decision-makers to design tools for municipal policy-making and programs for green building implementation. THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 17



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