Architecture Canada n°2 1er semestre 2007
Architecture Canada n°2 1er semestre 2007
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  • Parution : n°2 de 1er semestre 2007

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  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

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  • Nombre de pages : 52

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■ ■ ■ Health-care design www.raic.org/2007 ARCHITECT : STANTEC ARCHITECTURE/PHOTO : GRANT MACEACHERN, OAA, MRAIC lobby, features a play space for small children overlooking the entry garden. The adolescent psychiatric unit has a secure outdoor courtyard with a basketball hoop. For its efforts, Stantec Architecture received the 2001 Award of Excellence for Built Projects from the American Institute of Architects’Academy of Architecture for Health. Over in Prince Edward Island, Bergmark Guimond Hammarlund Jones in association with Stantec Architecture incorporated community consultation, and the use of bright colours and natural light, in leading the design of the new Prince County Hospital on a 27- acre site in Summerside. « The area is rural and agricultural, therefore The Nursing Station at the Prince County Hospital. we wanted to keep it low-scale and connected to the landscape, » explains Grant MacEachern, MRAIC, an associate with Stantec Architecture, who worked on the project as an intern architect. « We created a two-storey building that would spread horizontally on the land and suit the surrounding community better than a vertical scheme, which would be out of context with the surrounding rural landscape. » Opened in 2004, the 18,000-squaremetre, 102-bed hospital is closely connected to its surroundings, through window glazing, the use of natural and local materials (landscape stone, brick and wood detailing) and the inclusion of the work of PEI artists throughout its corridors and public spaces. 24 ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ARCHITECT : STANTEC ARCHITECTURE/PHOTO : GRANT MACEACHERN, OAA, MRAIC Its horizontal orientation also promotes accessibility. Diagnostic and treatment services are centralized and located near the main entrance facing north, while the in-patient units are located in pods on the south side of the building away from high-traffic public areas. « The pods are configured in a cruciformplan to ensure that staff have minimal walking distances to get to patients when they need immediate access, » says MacEachern. The in-patient area is also adjacent to two large courtyards : one is a healing garden, the other a place for meditation. And the hospital – about 30 per cent larger than its half-century-old predecessor facility – features skylights and large windows throughout the building so staff and patients « aren’t stuck in a rabbit warren all day, » says MacEachern. He explains that the $38.5 million project relied heavily on the input of hospital staff. « We held user-group sessions where we sat down with representatives from each medical department at every design stage and had a dialogue with them, » says MacEachern. « We went back and forth until we worked out the final plan, because we believed we wouldn’t be successful unless we combined our best practices with their specific needs. » While the Prince County Hospital project in PEI focused on blending the hospital into its The main circulation corridor on the second floor of the Prince County Hospital.
pastoral environment, the Quebec City firm, Les architectes d’Anjou, Lefebvre et Gagnon, has been focused on the urban challenge of linking an emergency department expansion (a trauma centre that serves eastern Quebec) to a more than 80-year-old hospital in the provincial capital. In the 1970s, Hôpital de l’Enfant-Jésus, which is affiliated with Université Laval, underwent an expansion of the surgical and emergency departments that resulted in massive grey concrete erected at the front of the hospital, explains Pierre d’Anjou, FIRAC, a partner in the firm, d’Anjou, Lefebvre et Gagnon. « At the time, concrete panelling was considered de rigueur. » In 1990, his colleague Jacques Gagnon led another, $40-million expansion that was more integrated with the yellow masonry of the original building. The latest expansion, at $13.7 million and scheduled to be completed by the spring of 2008, will build on top and in front of the concrete work from the 1970s, says d’Anjou. He explains that by expanding the existing space of the emergency department, the drab concrete that overwhelmedthat part of the hospital will be replaced by more of the original masonry and give « homogeneity » to the whole building. « When finished, the hospital may not look exactly like it did in the 1950s, but it will have a uniform, contemporary design. » Montreal architect Paul-André Tétreault, AP/FRAIC, is also designing a hospital emergency department. But his challenge lies indoors. Tétreault, who serves as the RAIC College of Fellow Chancellor and has the distinction of having designed more than one million square metres of hospital space throughout Quebec, is leading a team consisting of architects from the firm, Ædifica, and from ABCP Architects on a $34-million project to build a new, 5,000- square-metre emergency ward at Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont in Montreal’s east end. Scheduled to open in the summer of 2007, Maisonneuve-Rosemont’s emergency ward – the largest such hospital ward in the country – has required much attention to detail. Says Tétreault : « Usually in emergency departments, medical personnel work on patients in the same room with curtains dividing the stretchers. But the hospital wanted closed cubicles with bathrooms in each of the 55 cubicles. » He says it’s important to have the separation between patients and staff – particularly for the doctors and nurses in a hospital in a section of Montreal known for having « some tough guys. » In the new emergency ward, space for medical personnel will be situated in the centre and surrounded by examining rooms and cubicles. Tétreault, who was also involved in the Health-care design design of the Maisonneuve-Rosemont’s new $70-million ambulance centre that opened in 2004, says when approaching health-carerelated projects, architects need to keep an open mind. « Since all of us may endup going to a hospital at one point in our lives, the tendency might be to only consider the patient in our designs. » « But you always have to consider the big picture and think about the medical staff and their needs too. » ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 25 ■ ■ ■ www.raic.org/2007



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