Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
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  • Parution : n°1 de 2nd semestre 2006

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 88

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■ ■ ■ RFP www.raic.org/2006• any additional or unique requirements ; description of the architect selection process (as indicated in 2 below). 2. Establish policies, procedures and time frame for the Selection Process. You (the client) should:• be prepared to commit adequate time and resources to evaluate submissions thoroughly ; • select and invite appropriate and competent individuals to serve on the selection committee and confirmtheir availability on the dates chosen ; • for large or complex projects, give serious consideration to retaining an architect to aid in preparing the selection process and time frame ; • determine criteria for evaluating Expressions of Interest and for weighting and scoring proposals ; • confirmthat late submissions will not be accepted. 3. Compile List of Architects to be invited to submit Expressions of Interest:• consider the number of firms which can reasonably be evaluated ; • obtain architects’names : - from the RAIC website (refer to « Find an Architect ») or from the RAIC printed directory ; - from the directory (online or printed) of the provincial licensing body ; - by advertisement in local or national newspapers, or professional journals ; - by consulting colleagues for their recommendations, when appropriate. Note : The list may be developed based on the architects’geographic location, or if appropriate, a broader representation. 4. Request Expression of Interest. The following steps should be taken:• prepare a memo, addressed in alphabetical order, to allarchitects selected for invitation ; • list all information required to be included with each architect’s Expression of Interest ; • attach statements describing scope of the work and time frame ; • state the maximum number of pages to be provided by the architect in a Expression of Interest (usually 3-5 pages) ; • authorize the contact person to provide names of persons on the selection committee, if requested ; • ensure that each invited architect receives exactly the same information. 5. Evaluate Expressions of Interest, ensuring that you:• return, unopened, any submissions delivered after deadline ; • thoroughly review all Expressions of Interest based on pre-determined criteria. 6. Establish a Short List, by:• contacting references ; • developing a short list of three to five 78 THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA architects who will be invited to submit Technical Proposals and/or to be interviewed and notifying them ; • contacting architects not short-listed, expressing appreciation for their efforts and naming those who have been short-listed. Note : Decide whether or not the definition and complexity of project justifies requiring short-listed architects to submit Technical Proposals or to proceed directly to interviews (refer to step 11 below on procedures for obtaining Technical Proposals). 7. InformShort-listed Architects. You should:• establish a date for tour of site, if appropriate, or provide short-listed architects with site surveys and directions to visit site independently ; • ensure that all short-listed architects receive exactly the same information arising from any questions ; • provide, to all short-listed architects, a list of interview criteria and questions, explanation of scoring and selection process, the date, place and time for interviews and the names and titles of members of the interview committee. (Note : Advance availability of this information ensures consistent and fair comparisons of all candidates) ; • do not request sketches, cost estimates or suggested compensation ; • distribute feasibility studies or other reports, project functional program, or other background information to each short-listed architect or notify them where the documents are available for their review. 8. Interview Short-listed architects : The purpose of the interviews is to:• review the architects’expertise and relevant experience ; • evaluate their management approach, design personnel and consultants ; • compare different approaches to the design process, interpretation or understanding of the specific requirements of your project and compatibility with your expectations ; • explore issues relevant to the particular project, without being compromised by preconceived design solutions. Direct interaction between the client/user and the architect is essential for the development of a design that fully meets your (the owner’s) needs, therefore it is important for
the project’s intended users to participate in the interviews. Interviews may take place in the offices of short-listed firms or, alternatively, in your own premises. You, the client, should:• only interview the architects who have been short-listed ; • not consider sketches or other design work if such material is presented during the interview. At this early stage, architects will not yet have engaged in the essential interaction between architect and client which must precede the development of a valid design solution ; • not discuss the architects’compensation during these interviews ; • discussin advance with each short-listed architect what presentation facilities they may require and confirmwhether the interview room has adequate requirements (can be blacked-out, projector screen, internet connection or other) ; • if possible, provide two similar interview rooms so that one group can setup equipment while another group is being interviewed ; • schedule 45 minutes for each architect’s presentation, questions and answers, with 15 minutes between interviews, which allows time for the interview committee to discuss their initial impressions privately before the next interview begins ; • schedule all interviews on one day (or on consecutive days, if that is not possible) to assist the committee to achieveits objective of comparing all presentations consistently and fairly. 9. Ranking the Short-listed architects:• rank each architect using the weighting and scoring established earlier ; • summarize scores to determine ranking in order of preference and to document a record of the selection process ; • informthe architects of the committee’s decision on ranking as soon as possible, indicating that negotiations will commence immediately with the highest-ranked architect. 10. Negotiate an agreement with the highest-ranked architect : You, the client, should develop a detailed, comprehensive scope of services jointly with the highest-ranked architect, following which the architect will submit a detailed project work plan (a plan that itemizes the schedule for architectural services, key milestones and deliverables), listing consultants and the role and responsibilities of all members of the design and client teams. Refer to the following documents for a complete list of architectural services can be found in the Canadian Handbook of Practice for Architects, Chapter 2.1.10, Architectural Services and Fees : - Checklist : Scope of Services, December 2004 - Checklist : Supplemental Architectural Services, September 1999 Once the scope of services and work plan are agreed to, the architect will submit a compensation proposal for review and negotiation, referring to the Canadian Standard Formof Agreement between Client and Architect. Note that the architect’s compensation can be : - a percentage of construction cost, - a fixed fee, - based on hourly rates, or - a combination of the above. (Reimbursable expenses are additional and should not be considered in the evaluation). Negotiate the scope of services and compensation with one architect at a time ; if negotiations cannot be successfully completed with the first-ranked architect, they are abandoned, and negotiations begun with the second-ranked architect. Once agreement is reached, incorporate all the negotiated details into a written contract, which protects the interests of both client and architect. Finally, notify all the short-listed architects who were not selected, indicating the order of final ranking. 11.Technical Proposals : follow these additional procedures if the definition and complexity of your project justifies requiring short-listed architects to submit Technical Proposals : Be aware that the preparation and evaluation of Technical Proposals will require the commitment of significant expense and time for each short-listed architect as wellas for your technically experienced staff (or if they are not available, the engagement of specialist consultants). If you have concluded that Technical Proposals are required, ensure that the request:• includes all technical areas to be addressed ; • establishes a reasonable and appropriate maximum length for the submission ; RFP• lists interview criteria and questions ; • provides an explanation of the scoring and selection process, the date, place and time for interviews and the names and titles of members of the interview committee. (Advance availability of this information gives the best possible assurance that consistent and fair comparisons between candidates will be made). Review of Technical Proposals should precede interviews (steps 7 and 8) unless, you are already familiar with all the shortlisted architects, their staff and their consultants, in which case, you may determine that interviews will not be necessary. Ensure that the Technical Proposals have been reviewed and scored before the interviews take place, leaving time for clarifications during the interview and incorporate the results of the review and ranking of Technical Proposals into overall ranking. ■ THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 79 ■ ■ ■ www.raic.org/2006



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