Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
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  • Parution : n°1 de 2nd semestre 2006

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 88

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 8,1 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : design urbain, les villes de l'avenir.

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influence the extent of communication and education that in turn may affect the quality of care. Consideration of the amount of physical activity (such as travel distances) should be related to measures of fatigues, cognitive ability and medical errors, memory performance and outcome measures. » In Canada, a group formedby Credit Valley Hospital, Farrow Partnership and Workflow Integrity Network (WIN) and funded by a grant from the Ontario Health Association Change Foundation is collecting data on clinics, their nurses and patients whose purpose is « not just about a return on investment in terms of reduced absenteeism and improved patient safety, but to gather baseline information to improve the design and its architecture. » But how can design actually help to reduce diseases ? New chronic diseases that are greatly affecting American society (and by extrapolation Canadian society) include Type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis and obesity. One very effective treatment is walking ; unfortunately we have created environments where walking is very difficult and not encouraged – whether it be within a building which is only accessible by elevators, or, within a community where people must drive to visit neighbours or to buy milk. The US program, « Active Living by Design » has formedpartnerships with various cities in the US to help encourage physical activity to by supporting developments and land uses « that allow people to mingle in public spaces, create walkable neighborhoods, and promote safe walking to shops and schools. » The Centre for Disease Control in the USA states : People may make decisions based on their environment or community. For example, a person may choose not to walk to the store or to work because of a lack of sidewalks. Communities, homes, and workplaces can all influence people’s health decisions. Because of this influence, it is important to create environments in these locations that make it easier to engage in physical activity and to eat a healthy diet. Clearly we must direct architects to design communities, homes and workplaces that encourage and support walking and other forms of activity ! One other suggestion is to incorporate health issues into LEED – this would go beyond the existing « Indoor Environmental Quality » points – and include design features that encourage walking such as inviting and visible staircases and providing accessible pedestrian circulation within sites and around communities. Security is on everyone’s mind these days ! Architects, because of their unique training, can design solutions that provide not only security and safety, but also aesthetic appeal, functionality and openness. Today, projects can seamlessly incorporate a series of features into the building design such as security lighting, automatic controls and surveillance systems, and a range of detection and alarms systems. More importantly architects and security specialists can incorporate functional features such as What the best-dressed buildings wear. Design Matters sight lines and visibility, accessibility, natural lighting and landscape components into beautiful and transparent or « invisible » security features. Nevertheless, we need more research and study to determine the efficacy of many of these features and the costs benefits of « overengineering » certain features. Health, safety and the environment are allaffected by design although it is not always obvious. We know that good design matters, we just need more research to prove how much it really matters to the quality of life in Canada. ■ Fashion comes in many forms, which is why Hanson Brick offers hundreds of colours and textures to turn the building you design into something special. To learnmore about our products, call 1-877-HANSON8 or visit us at www.hansonbrick.com. THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 65 ■ ■ ■ www.raic.org/2006



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