Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°1 de 2nd semestre 2006

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 88

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 8,1 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : design urbain, les villes de l'avenir.

  • Prix de vente (PDF) : gratuit

Dans ce numéro...
< Pages précédentes
Pages : 52 - 53  |  Aller à la page   OK
Pages suivantes >
52 53
■ ■ ■ www.raic.org/2006 PHOTOGRAPHY : M. LAURENT GOULARD PHOTOGRAPHY : M. LAURENT GOULARD Sustainability Gene-H.-Kruger Pavillion - Corridor Gene-H.-Kruger Pavillion - Conference room a LEED-platinum standard in terms of environmental design and water and energy conservation. The planning and design process willalso be transparent. « Normally, it’s a conversation between a client and an architect that’s held behind closed doors, » explains Sinclair. « We’ve brought it into the public realm, where students and faculty members can ask architects questions about their ideas for a building and also raise issues. This public consultation has become part of the culture here. » A new design centre, established by the environmental design faculty in downtown Calgary, is intended to be a « think tank » on « spaces and places » where people live and work, and will host regular workshops and community discussions concerning such issues as the city’s urban core, architecture, urban design, 52 THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA planning, sustainability and « liveability, » says Sinclair. Across the country in Quebec City, Université Laval has embarked along the path to sustainability at its Sainte-Foy campus with the construction of the Gene-H.-Kruger Pavillion at Laval (namedafter the founder of a Quebec lumber company), which houses the Centre de Transformation sur le Bois Ouvré (CTBO, or Wood Products Research Centre) and which had its official opening during the fall of 2005. If the 250 or so researchers and students affiliated with the centre need inspiration, they could easily find it in their surroundings. The 8,000-square-metre building is made entirely of wood. Architect André Moisan, who helped lead architect (and since-retired) Paul Gauthier, FIRAC design the CTBO, says the faculty of forestry and geomatics wanted the facility to be both Laval’s first building that incorporates the principles of sustainable development and to reflect the mandate of the research centre. « The goal was to demonstrate how far you could go with the use of wood in a public building, » says Moisan, a partner with the Quebec-based firm, bbgl international. The primary structure is composed of wood joists, panels and siding in repetitive modules within a primary glue-laminated frame. The interior post-and-beam grid features composite wood panelling or gypsum board. Most ceilings are exposed wood. Inside the two-storey building, the honeycoloured wood has the look of trees. Outside, the grey-coloured wood siding imitates the appearance of both weathered wood and tree bark, and complements the predominantly limestone campus. Meanwhile, numerous windows and a glazed roof give the CTBO plenty of natural light – particularly in the research wing, which attains a floor-to-ceiling height of 10 metres. As Moisan describes it, « it looks like you’re outside when you’re inside. » He says that by following a sustainability model, the building willachievea 32-per-cent reduction in the energy it uses – and will likely receive LEED gold certification. After participating in his first « real green » project through the design of the CTBO, Moisan has become an advocate for sustainability. « If you do things right at the beginning, you can save a lot of money in the long term. » ■
ARE YOU SAFE ? For your safety, the Fire Department regularly inspects and replaces all fire fighting equipment. Again for your safety, you are asked to replace the batteries in your smoke detectors twice a year. What about your firestop devices ? To this day, every study indicates the firestop devices used with plastic pipes (ABS, PVC, and XFR) have a limited useful life. So why are these firestop devices never inspected or replaced after building occupancy ? Contrary to plastic sanitary and stormwater sewer pipes (ABS, PVC, and XFR TM), cast iron is non-combustible and does not require a firestop device. Cast iron, always a safe choice. 1-800-463-3480 www.bibby-ste-croix.com



Autres parutions de ce magazine  voir tous les numéros


Liens vers cette page
Couverture seule :


Couverture avec texte parution au-dessus :


Couverture avec texte parution en dessous :


Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 1Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 2-3Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 4-5Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 6-7Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 8-9Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 10-11Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 12-13Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 14-15Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 16-17Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 18-19Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 20-21Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 22-23Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 24-25Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 26-27Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 28-29Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 30-31Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 32-33Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 34-35Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 36-37Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 38-39Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 40-41Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 42-43Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 44-45Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 46-47Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 48-49Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 50-51Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 52-53Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 54-55Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 56-57Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 58-59Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 60-61Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 62-63Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 64-65Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 66-67Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 68-69Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 70-71Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 72-73Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 74-75Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 76-77Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 78-79Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 80-81Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 82-83Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 84-85Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 86-87Architecture Canada numéro 1 2nd semestre 2006 Page 88