Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°1 de 2nd semestre 2006

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 88

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 8,1 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : design urbain, les villes de l'avenir.

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■ ■ ■ Sustainability www.raic.org/2006 PHOTOGRAPHY : M. LAURENT GOULARD Gene-H.-Kruger Pavillion at Laval façade facing south that provides natural and passive ventilation for researchers’offices by capturing heat between the two « skins » and sending it out through windows. « Sustainability is part of the template we include in all of our briefs to architects, and outlines energy conservation issues and the measures they should be including in their designs, » says Sisam. In early 2005, the U of T extended its focus on sustainability beyond new construction to include existing buildings and support research projects in this area by inaugurating a centralized sustainability office that spans the entire mandate of the university, according to Beth Savan, the office’s first director. « The short-termmission is to dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and then to insert sustainability into all of the policies and procedures at the university, » says Savan, who holds a Ph.D. in ecology and serves as undergraduate co-ordinator for the U of T’s new centre for the environment. « The long-termvision is to integrate sustainability into the culture and activities of the university. » With $250,000 in financial support from the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, along with dollars from the federal and provincial governments, and the university itself, the sustainability office’s first major project involves replacing about 34,000 light fixtures and an estimated 72,000 lamps in three buildings (the Robarts Library, the medical sciences building and the Ontario Institute for Studies in Gene-H.-Kruger Pavillion - main entrance 48 THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA PHOTOGRAPHY : M. LAURENT GOULARD
THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 49 ■ ■ ■ Why use cast iron in building construction ? Because it has been proven that cast iron is more efficient than plastic (ABS, PVC) in reducing plumbing related noises. Many studies conducted both in Canada and abroad support this conclusion. Plastic piping (ABS, PVC) is noisier and significantly reduces the benefits associated to luxury washroom facilities. These are undeniable facts ! The buyer of a single family home or a condo who intends to invest tens of thousands of dollars is entitled to know that cast iron piping can greatly improve his comfort and quality of life. True building professionals - those who are quality conscious - will certainly agree with us. For more information, don’t hesitate to contact the experts at Bibby-Ste-Croix, the industry leader in the design, construction and marketing of gray cast iron used in commercial and residential buildings. 1-800-463-3480 www.bibby-ste-croix.com www.raic.org/2006



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