Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°1 de 2nd semestre 2006

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 88

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 8,1 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : design urbain, les villes de l'avenir.

  • Prix de vente (PDF) : gratuit

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■ ■ ■ Sustainability www.raic.org/2006 PHOTOGRAPHY : KEN JONES PHOTOGRAPHY : KEN JONES PHOTOGRAPHY : KEN JONES The food court inside the $30 million structure. 44 THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA « We went to the student population and asked if every student would be willing to pay $30 a semester for a student building on campus, » explains Dan Bandurka, who chaired the student building committee and who now works as a student recruitment officer on campus. The fundraising campaign would last 25 years and pay for the mortgage – and, in the process, become the single largest donation from the student body over the U of T’s 179-year history. In 2001, a referendum was held on the proposal and about 70 per cent of the student body voted in favour. A year later, the building project began. Bandurka, who in 2002 was the 21-year-old president of the Scarborough Campus Students’Union, says sustainability became the centrepiece of the vision for the student centre. « We wanted a building that was going to give back to future generations, and the Architects, Engineers and consultants were all on the same page right from the beginning, » he explains. « One of the primary goals was to think about sustainability from Day One and build it into everything we do, and thereby reduce our costs without having to go back and redo something down the road. » A small group, consisting of Bandurka, faculty members, the project manager, and Stephen Phillips, FRAIC, who headed the team from Stantec Architecture Ltd. that designed the building, left no stone unturned in ensuring that sustainability was incorporated into the 4,710 square-metre building, which opened in September 2004. Its shape, orientation and glazing pattern – along with a glass curtain wall on the north side of the building – maximizes the use of daylight, while large bare concrete floors and walls are exposed to winter sunlight to provide thermal mass capacity. Exterior sunshade devices reduce solar gain during the summer while admitting desired winter sun, and regularly occupied areas are equipped with operable windows to maximize passive ventilation. Offices and public spaces throughout the building have daylight and occupancy sensors to reduce lighting use when there’s enough daylight or when no one is present. Water conservation at the student centre, which cost about $10.5 million to construct, is also 20 per cent below the rate found in a conventional buildings through the use of waterless
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