Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°1 de 2nd semestre 2006

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 88

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 8,1 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : design urbain, les villes de l'avenir.

  • Prix de vente (PDF) : gratuit

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As the largest manufacturer of architectural metal fences in the world, Ameristar offers all the perimeter fence systems needed for property protection, access control, and direction of pedestrian traffic flow, while maintaining an open look that enhances architecture and landscaping. ORNAMENTAL STEEL Ameristar’s steel fences are galvanized and double-coated with epoxy primer and UVresistant finish to ensure durability and freedom from maintenance. IMPASSE Wide steel pales (2-3/4 ») provide moderate screening and strong resistance to vandals. Unlike easily cut chain link fences, Impasse ornamental steel security fences will delay intruders for several minutes, giving valuable time to initiate and implement ample countermeasures. ORNAMENTAL ALUMINUM ECHELON II Echelon II industrial aluminum fences are ideal for environments subject to high levels of moisture or salt-spray. The rail is reinforced with an internal stabilizer insert that multiplies the strength of the heavy-duty aluminum and creates the internal ForeRunner retaining system. ARCHITECTURAL METAL FENCES AEGIS II & AEGIS PLUS Heavy-duty square steel pickets (1 » or 3/4 ») provide both perimeter protection and visibility for surveillance. Ameristar’s Aegis systems employ the ForeRunner rail to add security and beauty by hiding the picket fastening system internally. MONTAGE PLUS Strength, the number one factor in fence life, is ensured by high-tensile steel pickets (3/4 ») and rails that are fusion welded at every intersection. Montage Plus ATF (All Terrain Fence) is the only welded steel fence with the capability to follow severe grade changes. DISTRIBUTORS THROUGHOUT CANADA - CALL 1-800-321-8724 Ameristar Fence Products ● 1555 N. Mingo Rd. ● Tulsa, Ok 74116 ● www.AmeristarFence.com
PHOTOGRAPHY : KEN JONES How Green is My University ? Sustainability Key to Future Design at Canadian Campuses By Christopher Guly F For nearly 40 years, students at the University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (UTSC) had no building to call their own. With no government money available, the students decided to take matters into their own hands and create a building that would both serve their present needs and be sustainable enough to accommodate students in the future. PHOTOGRAPHY : KEN JONES Sustainability In 1998, a group of U of T students at the Scarborough campus (designed by world-renowned architect John Andrews and which opened in 1964) formeda committee with the goal of building a student centre. After identifying a price tag, the committee set a $30 million budget for the project and set out to raise $20 million from the students themselves (the university agreed to cover the balance). Chair of the student building committee, Dan Bandurka inside the student centre. THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 43 ■ ■ ■ www.raic.org/2006



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