Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°1 de 2nd semestre 2006

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 88

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 8,1 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : design urbain, les villes de l'avenir.

  • Prix de vente (PDF) : gratuit

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■ ■ ■ www.raic.org/2006 Urban Design important role architects can fulfil as advocates for urban design. « But we have to be much more vocal and have to market our skills, » says Israeli-born Friedman, who writes a regular column for the CanWest newspaper chain and whose fifth and sixth books, Room for Thought : Rethinking Home and Community Design (Penguin Canada) and Homes Within Reach (John Wiley and Sons) were published in 2005. « We have to present at conferences and be actively involved with organizations, like the Canadian Federation of Municipalities, to show what we can do. » He fears that without a high profile, architects won’t be calledupon to assist and protect cities – especially those with populations of 50,000 and under — when big-box retailers and major developers target suburbs and threaten to decimate downtown areas. « No doubt, big boxes pay taxes and create employment. But at the same time, they have ripped apart the very fabric of cities, » Friedman says. « And if you walk into one of these stores, they have 30 different mini-stores in them – places where you can develop film, get your dry-cleaning done, have your shoes repaired – and each of these has killed 30 stores in the city. » If he had a say, he would ban big-box stores from settingup shop within the boundaries of a municipality as Burlington, Vermont has done. By preserving downtown commercial districts, the « regionality » lost in Canadian communities could begin to be restored, Friedman argues. « We’ve engineered out any common sense from the way we construct communities today and then etch them in stone through by-laws. So instead of allowing people to have lanes behind their homes where they can park their cars, we have these huge garages set in front of their homes. « These are anti-social statements and architects need to introduce some sensible solutions into communities. » Such as recognizing one of the principles of urban design that cities are composed of 18 THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA « character areas and attributes, whether it’s a residential neighbourhood or a nice commercial street, » says Gosselin. « It involves being sensitive to the history of a place – such as to existing buildings – and being able to do something that actually improves the situation while retaining its character and uniqueness. » Ottawa | From Affordable to Adaptable He explains that in his hometown, Ottawa, theupscale and eclectic Glebe neighbourhood has retained its popularity over several decades because it has been « adaptable » and has evolved from being an affordable ghetto for students attending nearby Carleton University (as he did) during the hippie days of the early 1970s to a gentrified – and far pricier – place for yuppies to settle in over the past decade. « The reason for its popularity is that people perceive the environment to be quite pleasant, with a mixture of shops and boutiques and historic homes, » explains Gosselin.
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