Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
Architecture Canada n°1 2nd semestre 2006
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°1 de 2nd semestre 2006

  • Périodicité : semestriel

  • Editeur : Naylor Canada

  • Format : (213 x 276) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 88

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 8,1 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : design urbain, les villes de l'avenir.

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Institute for Research in Construction Current – Close to 1300 technical changes have been included in the Codes to address advances in technology and health and safety concerns raised since the 1995 editions. Clear – Additional information explains the objectives that the Codes’provisions are intended to achieveand describes the functions that a building or its components must performto fulfill these objectives. Flexible – The additional information allows for flexibility by helping users evaluate alternative solutions. The 2005 Codes are therefore easier to apply to existing buildings and more responsive to innovation. Familiar – Much of the Code structure and vocabulary remains the same, so getting used to the new Codes is quick and easy. Close to 1300 technical changes Easy access to familiar Parts and provisions Clarification of the rationale behind each provision New information for evaluating alternative solutions 2005 National Construction Codes Blueprints for the Future T he 2005 editions of the National Building, Fire and Plumbing Codes of Canada offer many improvements over the 1995 editions, including technicalupdates and new information for understanding what must be done to satisfy the Codes’provisions. The new National Model Codes are clearer, easier to apply to existing buildings and more accommodating to innovation. Printed versions are now available in two practical formats : a binder and a soft cover version. Coming soon : In early 2006, the CD-ROM version of the Codes will be released together with User’s Guides available on CD-ROMs only, which will contain statements explaining the intent behind the Codes’provisions and what the provisions apply to. The User’s Guide to Part 4 of the National Building Code willalso be released in printed and CD-ROM formats. Seminars : The NRC Institute for Research in Construction (IRC), in coordination with the provinces and territories, is offering seminars on the technical changes in the 2005 National Construction Codes starting in December 2005 and extending into 2006. For more information : www.nationalcodes.ca 1-800-672-7990 or 1-613-993-2463 (Ottawa-Gatineau and U.S.) Start Planning for Tomorrow. Buy the Codes Today ! www.nrc.gc.ca/virtualstore
Cities of theFuture By Christopher Guly Yves Gosselin, FIRAC, has a vision for the future of urban Canada. In his view, cities don’t need to be capitals or large metropolitan areas with access to hordes of government and industry monies in order to thrive. They just need to follow good design, whether through revitalization of existing urban areas or the development of new ones – and involve everyone, from those working in municipal planning offices to residents of communities and neighbourhoods. To promote that approach, the RAIC president and former chief architect at the National Capital Commission in Ottawa established the RAIC urban design awards program in September 2004. One set of awards would be presented at the municipal level, the other, the following year, at the national level. It didn’t take long before cities signed onto the idea. In 2005, Edmonton, Calgary, Toronto and Ottawa handed out municipal RAIC Urban Design Awards. Two more cities – Hamilton and Halifax – presented similar prizes through programs both cities created on their own. This year, the RAIC will present the first ever Canadian Urban Design Awards, selected from a pool of contenders that include the winners at the municipal level. « The awards program is really about everyday life, » explains Gosselin, who serves as special advisor to the director general of professional technical programs at Public Works and Government Services Canada. « Yes, there are categories in which architects, landscape architects and urban designers can win awards for outstanding design, but there’s also an award for community improvement projects that a President - Yves Gosselin, community association could receive for something as modest as installing public art or a com- FIRAC memorative plaque in a park. » So-called urban fragments – « single, small-scale pieces of a building or landscape that contribute significantly to the quality of the public realm, » such as street furniture or lighting elements, have their own category. And, the Urban Design Awards program also honours the work of students attending schools of architecture across Canada. « Awards within the architectural community are typically exercises in backslapping and rewarding colleagues, where you also have to be an architect – and obviously a very good one – to receive a prize, » says Gosselin. « The Urban Design Awards celebrate initiatives on a human scale that mean something to ordinary citizens, and illustrate how cities and communities can have an impact on the quality of life of residents. » He explains that the RAIC’s new awards could also help spark an urban revival across Canada. It could mirror the « city beautiful » movement in the early 20th century and build on the urban design credo first promoted in the 1980s, which gave rise to such projects as the COUVRETTE/OTTAWA ARCHITECT : GRIFFITHS RANKIN COOK/PHOTO : A. SEARLE/LIGHTING : PHILIP GABRIEL, IALD Festival Plaza in Ottawa Urban Design ceremonial 7.5-kilometre Ottawa-to-Gatineau route, known as Confederation Boulevard, by the National Capital Commission (NCC) during Gosselin’s tenure there as director of design. The greatest challenge, however, lies in convincing the decision makers in cities of the « real value of investing in quality projects, » he says. « There are silos within municipalities where people in engineering build the roads and sidewalks but don’t talk to the planners and urban designers, and vice versa. They all tend to work in their own little worlds with their own reference systems. « But in order to really achievequality, you have to start doing things in a co-ordinated fashion. » Gosselin explains that when he was head of design and construction at the NCC, engineers, architects and landscape architects worked together as a team – an « integrated approach » that led to significant initiatives, including a major commercial-residential development at the 65-hectare LeBreton Flats not far from Parliament Hill. « But a city doesn’t have to be a national capital to be beautiful, » Gosselin says. « It just has to make the right moves. » Québec City | A Success Story Québec City is certainly a Canadian success story where politicians, notably the former mayor, Jean-Paul L’Allier, and city officials have made huge strides in reinforcing urban design by restoring historic buildings, inserting compatible and contextual modern structures in the heart of the city, and creating beautiful gardens, walkways and street ambience : indeed - a pedestrian delight ! In welcoming RAIC members to their annual conference held in Québec City in 2004 Mayor L’Allier commented : « although Québec City is on UNESCO’s prestigious list of world heritage sites, the city is not merely a museum. On the contrary, Québec City is a city alive and functioning, inhabited by its people, and invigorated by daily activity. » Toronto | The Right Approach In Yves Gosselin’s opinion, another one of those cities that took the right approach was Toronto, thanks to architect and urban designer THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA/L’INSTITUT ROYAL D’ARCHITECTURE DU CANADA ■ 15 ■ ■ ■ www.raic.org/2006



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