02 n°91 sep/oct/nov 2019
02 n°91 sep/oct/nov 2019
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°91 de sep/oct/nov 2019

  • Périodicité : trimestriel

  • Editeur : Association Zoo galerie

  • Format : (210 x 297) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 92

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 9,6 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : les frères Quistrebert.

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7 Interview Ben Thorp Brown 6
1 1 Guillaume Logé, Renaissance sauvage, Paris, Puf, 2019 (in French). 7 Interview Ben Thorp Brown 7 stress are diminished by the effects of living under conditions of relative scarcity. In the US, this might be an effect that is amplified by the way the system reproduces itself, often by making healthcare hard to access, whereas in Europe there may be more systems in place to diminish the extent of social and economic difference between people. The transhumanist literature is quite a long history, and Harari is not the most extreme example, but I was interested in an idea that cameup in Homo Deus, which was whether these new humans that he proposes would have the same collaborative instincts as our current one. He suggests that one of the distinct capacities of humanity is its ability to inhabit fictions, for better and worse, and considers what is the root of our collaborative instincts. Your practice deals with basic issues which seem to confront man with quite Cornelian and rather risky choices  : the technological temptation versus a certain formof renunciation and asceticism to get us out of the quagmire towards which humankind seems to be heading. Knowing that it is thoroughly impossible to predict power plays which will come into being in future societies, and that human beings will, in their great majority, remain unaware of virtuous arguments, as long as there are more or less no constraints, don’t you think that it’s quite utopian to imagine a society which is becoming more self-aware, and that art can usefully serve this « cause » ? I’m not interested in art that leaves no room to imagine another world. The other world might use familiar materials and forms, whether sculpture or painting, or more recent materials like moving image and performance, but I do believethat art can transformus, and the way we literally see and feel and know the world. In a lot of ways The Arcadia Center project comes from a somewhat dark idea, about whether our collective empathic capacities have diminished to the point where we need to practice them, so I think dystopia is always nearby any utopian imagining. For the philosopher Guillaume Logé, « the paradigms underpinning modernity and postmodernity must relinquish centre stage ; the logic of domination, at the root of imbalances, must be replaced by a collaborative logic. Man no longer aspires to become master and possessor of nature, but a strategic planner and a diplomat ». We might say that this line of thinking, which conspicuously incorporates the place of art in this idea of renewing the paradigms, is perfectly attuned to your practice, but, to get mentalities to shift, isn’t it important to create spectacular events in just as spectacular places ? What will be the new sacred places for exhibiting the masterworks of this « wild renaissance », to quote the title of his last book 1, who will produce the new Mona Lisa ? Are museums and/or art centres the best placed sites for spreading these new visions ? Yes, I think that, to shift mentalities, we will need to use the tools of spectacle and tools that engage our emotional, affective lives for us to feel more critical. I do think certain projects really need a special place for drawing people into a new vision, and often these places are hard to access, the spectacular places in the world. I do think museums have a unique advantage in that they can really reach lots of people effectively, and so there’s a lot of good in this model too. How are we to convey this experiential demand which you lay claim to, in your art ? It isn’t always easy to get powerful messages acrossin a practice without these latter taking precedence over the aesthetic dimension of the works… I like to takeup the whole exhibition experience as a part of my practice, following in a line of artists that have developed the potential of the exhibition as form. As exhibitions are very particular ways of embodying knowledge in a spatial environment, I want to work with these aspects as they alter how a viewer feels within a given environment, considering these elements like a kind of choreography of the visitor. My recent shows have had elements of participation, which invited visitors to engage in a kind of praxis, but they also engaged with more familiar kinds of spectatorship that are used in contemporary art spaces. I think different visitors probably had very different experiences with the work, whereas some allowed themselves to be present as a participant, others might have prefered to remain one step removed as a spectator of the activity. The aesthetic dimension is of central importance, and operates underneath all of the embodied participation, as these sculptures, forms, images, and sounds are all critical for how a viewer begins to understand and learnhow to feel about the world.



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