02 n°91 sep/oct/nov 2019
02 n°91 sep/oct/nov 2019
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°91 de sep/oct/nov 2019

  • Périodicité : trimestriel

  • Editeur : Association Zoo galerie

  • Format : (210 x 297) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 92

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 9,6 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : les frères Quistrebert.

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6 Essay Kill Your Id(e)ol(ogie)s 8 of the praxis, producing a subject summoned to be ever more efficient and competitive. The latter is drawn into a spiral of self-optimization that he believes he desires but actually executes by default, due to the lack of external structures able to guarantee arbitration. The shift from formto subject reflects the pressure weighing on the artist  : the artist, in order to emerge, to be visible (and, once again, because the structures opposing competition are breakingup), is calledupon to affirma coherent, identifiable position as a subject. Ambiguity—that ambiguity of the work, that of the different parts of the same artist’s production—, it is understandable, is an obstacle. In their conversation published in Texte zur Kunst, Chris Kraus and Ariana Reines mentioned the profitability of affects. The latter stated  : « In a certain sense, what artists sell is in a way the iterations of a certain subjective position that they represent. From there, they can make many versions of what they produce […]. And so, in a way, everything happens as if you were buying part of the state of consciousness they represent. » 4 On the other hand, as far as reception is concerned, Bret Easton Ellis identifies in the Hollywood actor, always measured, moderate, pleasant and almost « air-conditioned », the premises of the default condition of individuals in the neoliberal regime. The case of contemporary art and politically motivated works is more about an agreement on « good » values than a middle ground. The contentious side of politics, and of the human being, is ignored. The raw political fact is transformedinto established politics, and one then comes before the works to acquiesce en masse to the dominant paradigms of one’s group rather than to rethink one’s systems of thought —even if it means leaving with regrounded, reinforced convictions. These reflexes are the basis for the mass manipulations to which unleashed neoliberal individuals are no less exposed, precisely because they depoliticize and practice politics only as an external sign of allegiance to consensus. Where has the individual with a critical consciousness gone, that individual who would not preexist the work but would rather be shaped by it, by the specific space-time required for its apprehension and by the reconfiguration of perceptual habits and moral certainties that we would be entitled to demand from it ? The mode of reception of works, of these works Bret Easton Ellis, White, 2019, Paris, Robert Laffont.
6 Essay Kill Your Id(e)ol(ogie)s 9 favoured, even generated by a neoliberal structure of competition between precarious individuals, also leads to a disempowerment of the individual themself. We are witnessing, such would be the ultimate observation, a capture of the individual by the vocabulary and values of neoliberalism. The individual would necessarily be on the side of profitability, while massing with a web of other individuals, not a group as such, but a constellation of these virtuous robots juxtaposed by a consensus that, in reality, does not come so much from a measured adherence as from the integration by each of them of the regulatory norm. In fact, the progressive fringe of society, the one that goes to the theatre or to the museum, simply seems to have abandoned the individual to the enemy. The works are aimedat the group, at the masses, without any attempt to win back the individual and make them a subject thinking rather than interested, free rather than muzzled, as if the fatalistic attitude had led to stop fighting to make the art space a space preserved from the logic of real life. The works urge the group to participate, to be useful, to produce (social cohesion, consensus, perhaps marketable convictions ?). Olivier Neveux emphasizes  : « This is the watchword, it is valued to commit, to do rather than to look, to be at the initiative rather than a spectator » (p. 181) This « emotional blackmail » demanding « to do, to participate » that he emphasizes has shifted since this year. The political commitment of artists has become structural. It concerns the nature of institutions, their ideological orientation. This is where the efforts must be concentrated. Thus, from the Whitney Biennale, we mainly retain the action against Warren B. Kanders and the artists who have chosen to withdraw their works—seizing the mechanics underlined above that capitalizes on their subjective positions 5. But it seems equally urgent not to leave the work as food for militant purposes. The present moment, and the direct actions of artists, would be an ideal turning point to finally separate ideology from aesthetics, to establish the purity and interdependence of both within this total project that art is—art, and not culture. It’sup to the aesthetic work to be the stone of complexity in the shoe of simple neoliberalism again, the place of an experience of radical otherness, and the rock against which existing taxonomies, designations and certainties would run aground. 1 https://www.vulture.com/2019/05/whitney-biennial-review-jerry-saltz.html 2 Bret Easton Ellis, White, 2019, Paris, Robert Laffont. 3 Olivier Neveux, Contre le théâtre politique, 2019, Paris, La fabrique. 4 https://www.textezurkunst.de/103/feelings-i-fail-to-capitalize/5 Michael Rakowitz refused to participate and announced it in February. Two months after the inauguration, Korakrit Arunanondchai, Meriem Bennani, Nicole Eisenman, Nicholas Galanin, Eddie Arroyo, Christine Sun Kim, Agustina Woodgate and Forensic Architecture removed their works from the exhibition.



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