02 n°91 sep/oct/nov 2019
02 n°91 sep/oct/nov 2019
  • Prix facial : gratuit

  • Parution : n°91 de sep/oct/nov 2019

  • Périodicité : trimestriel

  • Editeur : Association Zoo galerie

  • Format : (210 x 297) mm

  • Nombre de pages : 92

  • Taille du fichier PDF : 9,6 Mo

  • Dans ce numéro : les frères Quistrebert.

  • Prix de vente (PDF) : gratuit

Dans ce numéro...
< Pages précédentes
Pages : 24 - 25  |  Aller à la page   OK
Pages suivantes >
24 25
2 Guest Bernard Frize 2 From the Operator’s Seat Bernard Frize — by Vincent Pécoil Frize works in disparate series. In his œuvre there are no emblematic forms, with the possible exception of his pictures made with what he calls « painted » brushes (meaning that several colours are applied to the brushes and, once they are applied to the canvas, they leave a multi-coloured imprint). Each series is associated with a particular kind of procedure, and is an attempt to exhaust a set of possibilities peculiar to it, composition-wise. By frequently changing his way of doing things, Frize tries to avoid what he calls the « personification of abstraction ». By simultaneously showing everything, the retrospective show at the Centre Pompidou redoubled the intent of the work itself by being, itself, a struggle against style, and signature. It was an all-over retrospective, with no hierarchy between the old and the new, the abstract and the figurative, the large and the small, overlapping the exhibition arrangement with the principles of the paintings. People generally reckon that Frize is an « abstract » painter, but a certain number of paintings from the early years are figurative and, in a more general way, each series can also be seen as an effort to make this distinction problematic. The series of « professions » is part of the figurative pictures, in the literal sense. In these pictures, such as Max Dormoy, the symbols of different professions float on dark backgrounds. These figures were first painted on bits of plastic and then laid, or « transferred » (as we would say if what was involved was transferring figures onto a piece of clothing) onto the canvas. In this case, the images were found and reproduced all over the picture, with no apparent order. As ever, the technique used is relatively simple. In the « pots » series, which Article japonais is part of, the technique used for the background is made of crackle lacquer—a type of paint used in decoration to simulate the age of the painted object. If the Japanese object actually has nothing Japanese about it, on the other hand it has something to do with the image of art itself, and with what « makes » art  : the cracks, the old, antique look. And this applies metaphorically to all the images the artist uses  : they are generic images, images which signify them all. Paintings like Rami and Emir, to take just two examples in another series, produce this extraordinary thing which is the « illusion of an image », as it happens an illusion of landscape. The drips and flows, the chemical bath in which the different types of paints used interact, the angle of the canvas after the application, all this endsup producing an image, an image which, strictly speaking, is not an image, but which nevertheless conjuresup the mountainscapes of Chinese painting. The title, Emir, invites us to make a comparison with the world of mirages, while the effect of Rami underscores the role of chance in its making—an interplay of combinations, obtained from rules but retaining a random element. The same kind of involuntary illusion was already at work in his very earliest paintings, those made with the help of « traînards », a kind of extremely fine brush, with the strictly abstract composition having in the end the look of flecked fabric. Conversely, the series made shortly thereafter with printing rollers makes the most of the tool to get rid of the image by saturation, and by multiplying the actions. More recently, with Oude, the image is obtained by the destruction of another image coming before it. In a word, for one lost illusion, there is one re-found. Not using images is tantamount to creating one, while accumulating them makes them disappear, or merges them in just one. These illusions of images, in the case of the involuntary landscapes, or the illusion of their disappearance through excess, are a way of asserting the nature of abstraction as an image. Once it exists, the painting makes an image, with or without a figure. So we can understand the frequent use of white backgrounds in his pictures as a graphic reference to the world of imagery—a sensation linked with the white ground of a certain number of pictures, which conjuresup the white backdrop of the page, the background against which the forms and illustrations stand out, reinforcing the sensation of flatness. These ambiguities about the image have the effect of emphasizing the material nature of things and the way they are made. This anti-illusionism has a purpose, which is to bring things forth, and index the economy of the picture —otherwise put, the way in which the paint ing is organized and produced. « Painting is a physical task (a mechanical art), whose productive economy I try to make the best use of. The experience level overlaps with the image
Bernard Frize, RAMI, 1993. Acrylique, nacre, encre et résine sur toile/acrylic, mother-of-pearl, ink and resin on canvas, 205 × 194 cm. Collection particulière/Private collection. Bernard Frize/Adagp, Paris 2019. Photo André Morin. Bernard Frize, Spitz, 1991. Acrylique et résine sur toile/acrylic and resin on canvas, 254,5 × 361,5 cm. Tate  : Achat grâce au soutien des Patrons of New Art via la Tate Gallery Foundation/purchased with assistance from the Patrons of New Art through the Tate Gallery Foundation, 1996. Photo Tate, London 2019. Bernard Frize/Adagp, Paris 2019. 2 Guest Bernard Frize 3



Autres parutions de ce magazine  voir tous les numéros


Liens vers cette page
Couverture seule :


Couverture avec texte parution au-dessus :


Couverture avec texte parution en dessous :


02 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 102 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 2-302 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 4-502 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 6-702 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 8-902 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 10-1102 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 12-1302 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 14-1502 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 16-1702 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 18-1902 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 20-2102 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 22-2302 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 24-2502 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 26-2702 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 28-2902 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 30-3102 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 32-3302 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 34-3502 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 36-3702 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 38-3902 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 40-4102 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 42-4302 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 44-4502 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 46-4702 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 48-4902 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 50-5102 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 52-5302 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 54-5502 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 56-5702 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 58-5902 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 60-6102 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 62-6302 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 64-6502 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 66-6702 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 68-6902 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 70-7102 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 72-7302 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 74-7502 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 76-7702 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 78-7902 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 80-8102 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 82-8302 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 84-8502 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 86-8702 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 88-8902 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 90-9102 numéro 91 sep/oct/nov 2019 Page 92